CRJS 215 Class 2A

CRJS 215 Class 2A - Chapter 2 The Nature and Extent of...

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Chapter 2 The Nature and Extent of Crime
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How Criminologists Study Crime Survey Research Self-report surveys and interviews: A research approach that requires their own participation in delinquent or criminal acts Victimization surveys Sampling (selection process) Select a limited number of people for study as representative of a large group. Population (sharing of similar characteristics) Example: All high school students or all police officers Cross-sectional research (representative of all society)
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How Criminologists Study Crime Cohort Research: Longitudinal and retrospective Cohort involves observing a group of people who share similar characteristics Following cohorts is expensive and time consuming Examination of school, police, and courts records
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How Criminologists Study Crime Official Record Research Criminologists use the records of government agencies to study crime The Uniform Crime Report (UCR) data is collected by local law enforcement agencies and published yearly by the FBI Census Bureau data used for information about income
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How Criminologists Study Crime Weblink: http://www.fbi.gov/ucr/ucr.htm
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How Criminologists Study Crime Experimental Research Manipulation and intervention techniques Three elements: (1) random selection, (2) control group, and (3) experimental condition Criminological experiments are rare due to expense and ethical concerns
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How Criminologists Study Crime Observational and Interview Research Commonly focuses on a few subjects for study In-depth interviews to gain insight into a behavior Field participation (Whyte’s Street Corner Society )
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How Criminologists Study Crime Meta-Analysis and Systematic Review Meta-analysis involves gathering data from previous studies Grouped data provides powerful indication of relationships between variables Systematic review involves collecting and synthesizing evidence to address a particular scientific question (street lighting and crime)
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Measuring Crime Trends and Rates Official Data: The Uniform Crime Report (UCR) More than 17,000 police agencies contribute records Index Crimes (Part I) Murder Non-negligent manslaughter Forcible rape Robbery Aggravated assault Burglary Larceny Arson Motor vehicle theft Non-Index Crime (Part II) All other crimes Does not include traffic offenses
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Measuring Crime Trends and Rates Compiling the Uniform Crime Report Each month law enforcement agencies report index crimes Unfounded or false reports are to be eliminated from the actual count Each month law enforcement agencies report the number of crimes cleared (by arrest or exceptional means) Slightly more than 20 percent of all reported index crimes are cleared by arrest each year Victim crimes are more likely to be solved than property
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Measuring Crime Trends and Rates Uniform Crime Reports Validity
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course CRJS 215 taught by Professor O'toole during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

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CRJS 215 Class 2A - Chapter 2 The Nature and Extent of...

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