CRJS 215 Chapter 6

CRJS 215 Chapter 6 - Chapter 6 Social Structure Theory...

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Chapter 6 Social Structure Theory
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Socioeconomic Structure and Crime The U.S. is a stratified society: social strata are created by the unequal distribution of wealth, power, and prestige. Social classes are segments of the population who share attitudes, values, norms, and an identifiable lifestyle The poverty rate is 2003 was 12.5 percent Nearly 36 million people live in poverty
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Socioeconomic Structure and Crime Child Poverty Poverty during early childhood has a more severe impact than during adolescence Low income children are less likely to achieve in school and more likely to suffer health problems Social problems in lower-class slum areas are epidemic Nearly 25 percent of children under age 6 live in poverty
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Socioeconomic Structure and Crime Weblink www.aecf.org/kidscount
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Socioeconomic Structure and Crime The Underclass Culture of poverty is passed from one generation to the next Gunnar Myrdal suggested that an “underclass” was cut off from society Unemployment and underemployment disrupts family life and creates despair
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Socioeconomic Structure and Crime Minority Group Poverty 20 percent of African Americans and Hispanics live in poverty 10 percent of Whites live in poverty William Julius Wilson suggests disadvantaged minorities direct their aggression toward those close to them
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Social Structure Theories Social and economic forces in deteriorated lower-class areas push residents into criminal behavior patterns Social structure theories include, social disorganization, strain theory, and cultural deviance theory Each theory suggests that socially isolated people living in disorganized areas are the ones most likely to experience crime- producing social forces
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Social Disorganization Theories Links crime rates to neighborhood ecological characteristics Social disorganization includes low income groups with large single-parent households and institutions of broken down social control Residents in crime-ridden areas are trying to leave at the earliest opportunity
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Social Disorganization Theories The Work of Shaw and McKay Linked transitional slum areas to the inclination to commit crime Transitional neighborhoods are incapable of inducing residents to defend against criminal groups Concentric zone mapping identified the inner-city transitional zones as having the heaviest concentration of crime. Slum children choose to join gangs when values are in conflict
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CRJS 215 Chapter 6 - Chapter 6 Social Structure Theory...

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