CRJS 215 Chapter 7

CRJS 215 Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Social Process Theories Socialization and Crime Social process theories suggest criminality is a function of

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Chapter 7 Social Process Theories
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Socialization and Crime Social process theories suggest criminality is a function of socialization Any person regardless of race, class or gender can become criminal Elements of family, peer group, school, and church contribute to socialization processes
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Socialization and Crime Family Relations Family plays a critical role in the determinant of behavior Parental efficacy refers to supportive parents who effectively control their children Links between inconsistent discipline and delinquency
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Socialization and Crime Weblink www.childpolicy.org
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Socialization and Crime Child Abuse and Crime Linkage between child abuse, neglect, sexual abuse, and crime Children subjected to abuse are more likely to use violence in personal interactions In nonviolent societies, parents rarely punish children physically
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Socialization and Crime Educational Experience Children who fail in school offend more frequently than those who succeed Schools contribute to delinquency by labeling students School dropouts have a significant chance of entering a criminal career 2003 national survey estimates about 1.5 million violent incidents occur in public schools each year
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Socialization and Crime Peer Relations Children seek out peer groups between the ages of 8 and 14 Peer Rejection: Children rejected by peers are more likely to display aggressive behavior Pro-social friends may inhibit criminality Peers and Criminality: Antisocial peer groups increase the likelihood of delinquency Mark Warr suggests delinquent friends tend to be “sticky” meaning they are not easily lost once they are acquired
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Socialization and Crime Institutional Involvement and Belief Religion binds people together Travis Hirschi and Rodney Stark found the association between religion attendance, belief, and delinquency is insignificant Recent research contends that attending religious services is a significant inhibitor of crime
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Socialization and Crime The Effects of Socialization on Crime Social learning theory suggests people learn techniques of crimes from criminal peers Social control theory contends people are controlled by their bonds to society Social reaction theory argues that society contributes to criminality through the use of labels
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Social Learning Theory Crime is a product of learning norms, values, and behaviors associated with criminal activity Differential Association: Edwin H. Sutherland’s view that criminality is a function of the socialization process
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Social Learning Theory Differential Association Theory Differential Association: Edwin H. Sutherland’s view that criminality is a function of the socialization process Criminal behavior is learned Learning is a by-product of interacting with others Learning criminal behavior occurs within intimate personal groups Learning criminal behavior involves assimilating the
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course CRJS 215 taught by Professor O'toole during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

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CRJS 215 Chapter 7 - Chapter 7 Social Process Theories Socialization and Crime Social process theories suggest criminality is a function of

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