CRJS 215 Chapter 11

CRJS 215 Chapter 11 - Chapter 11 Property Crimes A Brief History of Theft Economic crimes acts in violation of the criminal law designed to bring

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Chapter 11 Property Crimes
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A Brief History of Theft  Economic crimes: acts in violation of the criminal law designed to bring financial reward Skilled thieves: typically worked in larger cities and congregated in “flashouses” Smugglers: moved freely in the sparsely populated areas and dealt in spirits, gems, gold, and spices Poachers lived in the country taking game that belonged to a landlord 10% to 15% of the US population are victims of theft each year today
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Modern Thieves Occasional Criminals (Two Types of Thieves) Most crime committed by amateurs whose acts are unskilled, and unplanned Occasional crime occurs when there is a situational inducement Situational inducement is a short term influence on a person’s behavior, such as financial problems or peer pressure, which increases risk taking. Frequency of occasional crime varies according to age, class,  race, and gender Occasional criminals have little group support for the crimes
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Modern Thieves Professional Criminals (Two Types of Thieves) Make a significant portion of their income from crime. Professionals do not rationalize their criminality Pursue their craft to make the most money with the least amount of risk Youth: old experienced offender show the ropes Juvenile gangs: Example: Young Park: Stealing GMC Cars Youth sent to Prison
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Modern Thieves Sutherland’s Professional Criminal Professional thieves engage in limited types of crime Exclusive use of wits, front (demeanor), and talking ability Must acquire status in the profession Pickpocket  Thief in rackets related to confidence games Forger Extortionist from those engaging in illegal acts  Confidence game artists Thief who steals from hotel rooms Jewel thief who substitutes fake gems for real  (pennyweighter)  Shoplifter (booster) Sneak thief from stores, banks, and offices (heel)
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Modern Thieves The Professional Fence Earns a living buying and reselling stolen merchandise May operate through legitimate business fronts Fences use complex pricing policy Upfront cash, knowledge of dealing, connection with suppliers,  connection with buyers, complicity with law enforcement
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course CRJS 215 taught by Professor O'toole during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

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CRJS 215 Chapter 11 - Chapter 11 Property Crimes A Brief History of Theft Economic crimes acts in violation of the criminal law designed to bring

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