CRJS 215 Victims Class 3

CRJS 215 Victims Class 3 - Victims and Victimization...

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Victims and Victimization Victimologists - criminologists who focus their attention on crime victims The National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) estimates 24 million victimizations in the U.S. annually.
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Problems of Crime Victims Economic Loss Taken together, property and productivity losses run in the hundreds of billions of dollars. System costs - adding together the cost of the justice system, legal costs, treatment costs, etc., the total loss due to crime is about $450 billion annually, or about $1,800 per U.S. citizen.
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Problems of Crime Victims Economic Loss Individual costs - victims may suffer losses in earnings and occupational attainment. Macmillan estimates an $82,000 loss in earnings over the lifetime for American adolescent victims of violent crime; $237,000 loss for Canadian victims. The psychological and physical problems resulting from the victimization lead to delayed educational achievement and professional success.
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Problems of Crime Victims System Abuse Representatives of the justice system (police, counselors, prosecutors) may revictimize them with a calloused attitude or innuendos concerning blame.
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Problems of Crime Victims Long-Term Stress Victims may suffer stress and anxiety long after the incident. Adolescent victims may report lower self- esteem, more suicidal, higher risk of being abused again, more likely to run away from home, eating disorders, homelessness, etc.
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Problems of Crime Victims Long-Term Stress Spousal abuse victims often are psychologically abused in addition to the physical abuse. Spousal abuse victims report higher levels of depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, anxiety disorder, and obsessive-compulsive disorder. Some victims have to deal with a resulting physical disability (including spinal cord injuries).
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Problems of Crime Victims Fear Fundamental life change - view world more suspiciously. Rather than forgetting past, some have found confronting it therapeutic. Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) - Psychological reaction to a highly stressful event; symptoms may include depression, anxiety, flashbacks, and recurring nightmares. Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder - An extreme preoccupation with certain thoughts and compulsive performance of certain behaviors.
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Problems of Crime Victims Antisocial Behavior Strong evidences that people who are crime victims seem more likely to commit crime themselves. Cycle of Violence Abuse-crime phenomenon - boys and girls more likely to engage in violent behavior if they were: the target of physical abuse exposed to violent behavior among the adults they knew or lived with; and/or exposed to weapons
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The Nature of Victimization The Social Ecology of Victimization The Victim’s Household Victim Characteristics Victims and Their Criminals
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The Nature of Victimization The Social Ecology of Victimization Violent crimes are more likely to take place in
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course CRJS 215 taught by Professor O'toole during the Spring '08 term at Old Dominion.

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CRJS 215 Victims Class 3 - Victims and Victimization...

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