dissociative - VI. Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders 1....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
VI. Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders       1. Somatoform Disorders A. include a variety of conditions in which psychological conflicts become translated into     physical problems that cause impairment in one’s life B. Conversion disorder - involves the translation of unacceptable drives or troubling conflicts into bodily motor sensory   symptoms that suggest a medical problem - symptoms are not intentionally produced - “converts” psychological conflict into physical problem - Paul Briquet, 1800s, France ∙ systematically described & categorized symptoms of hysteria (now conversion disorder) - Jean Martin Charcot, late 19 th  century, French neurologist ∙ used hypnosis to show psychological factors played a role in hysteria - Pierre Janet, student of Charcot ∙ theorized that the difference between normal and hysterical people was due to the   presence of dissociated contents of the mind (in hysterics) - Freud called conversion disorder ‘hysterical neurosis’ ∙ implies conversions were in response to anxiety (neurosis) - many physical disorders can be produced or aggravated by emotional problems - individuals may dismiss physical problems and may pay little to no attention to them - la belle indifference (‘the beautiful lack of concern’): indicated individuals are not concerned with   their perplexing physical problems - conversion symptoms fall into four categories ∙ motor symptoms or deficits ∙ sensory symptoms or deficits ∙ seizures or convulsions ∙ mixed presentations - affects one to three percent referred for mental health care - runs in families - symptoms range considerably from person to person - difficult for health professionals to diagnose C. Somatization disorder and related conditions - somatization disorder involves the expression of psychological issues through bodily problems that    cannot be explained by any known medical condition ∙ involve multiple and recurrent bodily symptoms rather than a single complaint ∙ seem to intentionally be faking a complex medical problem, most have no idea ∙ stressful events can cause episodic intensification of the symptoms ∙ in many cases, home life was bad and involved an alcoholic or antisocial parent[s] ∙ do not voluntarily seek psychotherapy and often make it clear they feel misdiagnosed by   physicians ∙ chances for success are slim - pain disorder: a form of pain is the predominant focus of the client’s medical complaint ∙ chronic pain may be on a spectrum of what are called “internalizing disorders” (includes   mood, anxiety and somatization disorder) ∙ do not express emotional conflicts outwardly but instead hold them in
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/11/2008 for the course PSYCH 380 taught by Professor Halgin during the Spring '08 term at UMass (Amherst).

Page1 / 5

dissociative - VI. Somatoform and Dissociative Disorders 1....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online