EES 108 Class 02_1

EES 108 Class 02_1 - Weather Maps First weather maps:...

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Weather Maps First weather maps: 1680-1700: Edmund Halley maps wind patterns  over oceans 1810-20: Alexander von Humboldt maps  temperature of ocean surface 1816: Heinrich Wilhelm Brandes proposes maps  of weather for previous year 1819: Brandes publishes 3 weather maps for  Europe Do not worry about these names and  dates. I will not test you on them
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Brandes’s first map
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1821: William Redfield discovers circular patterns in  fallen trees from a hurricane 1844: Samuel Morse runs telegraph between  Washington DC and Baltimore 1846: Redfield and Elias Loomis propose using  telegraphs to produce timely weather maps 1847: Smithsonian Institution funds Joseph Henry to  use telegraphy for weather maps 1857: Henry starts producing weather maps and  forecasts 1870: Weather mapping, forecasting go to Army  Signal Corps.
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Problem: Too few stations 1840-70: Telegraphs spread across US. Used  to produce up-to-date weather maps 1870: 24 weather stations in US 1880: 181 stations Growth 150 local weather maps in 1880 3000 in 1891 25,000 in 1903 By late 19 th  century:  standard format for weather maps
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Basic weather maps Surface observations: Pressure (current and trend) Temperature Humidity (dewpoint) Wind (direction and speed) Cloud cover Precipitation (type and amount)
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Weather: Temperature
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Weather: Humidity
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Weather: Cloud cover
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Weather: Precipitation
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Weather: Pressure
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Weather: Wind
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“Standard” Weather Map  Jan 15 2007
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Weather Station Model Temperatures on US weather maps are in °F
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Wind barbs Half-barb = 5 knots Full barb = 10 knots Triangle (Flag) = 50 knots Textbook (Appendix B) and  exercise book (Appendix D) can be  confusing Units of miles per hour or  kilometers per hour, when barbs  refer to knots 1 knot = 1.85 kilometers per hour 1 knot = 1.15 miles per hour Tests will ask about knots
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EES 108 Class 02_1 - Weather Maps First weather maps:...

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