vesfams1 - Vessel Familiarization Basic Safety...

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Vessel Familiarization & Basic Safety Training (MT1111) Case Study S.S. Marine Electric Survival Group 1: Henkenmeier, Andrew Hoar, Christopher Kallstrom, Brent Kelly, Mathew Kerrigan, Michael Lacasse, Jeffrey
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Introduction On 12 February 1983 the coal collier S.S.Marine Electric, while in route from Norfolk, Virginia with a destination to Brayton, Massachusetts, fully loaded with steam coal, reported to the USCG that she was taking on water and going down by the head. As the vessels crew was preparing to abandon ship, the Marine Electric capsized, throwing most of the thirty four crewmembers into the frigged water. Rescue efforts were made by the USCG, USN and the USMM. There were three survivors and twenty four bodies, seven bodies remained missing and were presumed dead. The vessel sank in 120 feet of water approximately thirty nautical miles off he coast of Virginia.
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Case Study Overview Dangers to survivors Fear Positive and negative actions taken during emergency Problems with life boats and life rafts Survival gear used along with gear that could have helped and possibly saved more survivors Precautions that should have been taken
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The Main Dangers to Survivors Many of the crew-members died from two main dangers. There would have been more surviving crew-members if the ship and crew were properly outfitted to encounter the worst possible scenario. The two major dangers that the crew-members encountered were hypothermia and drowning. Hypothermia the main danger to survivors could have been delayed if only the crew-members were wearing proper clothing such as multiple layers with a slick outer surface such as Gortex. If the Master had abandoned ship earlier the crew would have been able to get the life boats and life rafts out.
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Dangers Continued The second major danger was drowning , which could have been avoided for the most part if only the crew were properly dressed, equipped with PFD’s and were able to get the life boats and life rafts out in time. Another danger that added to the difficulty to survive was the large amounts of oil that spilled into the water creating oil slicks all over the surface of the water and on the crew that were tossed into the water.
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Influence of Fear Fear was clearly a strong influence on many of the members aboard the SS Marine Electric. Fear is apparent in many different aspects such as: Situation recognition
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vesfams1 - Vessel Familiarization Basic Safety...

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