RESPONSE PAPER 10 - RESPONSE PAPER 10 Martin Luther...

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RESPONSE PAPER 10 Martin Luther Luther’s actions were not necessarily revolutionary, per se. There had been conflict in Christianity ever since it began, with such rebel sects as the Arians, who, while not considered Christians by the church, shared many of the basic tenets. Later, in the 12 th century, came the Waldensians, whom the church found threatening because of their preaching of complete asceticism. Luther obviously came after all of this in the 16 th century, so the idea of criticizing the church and seeking reform was not exactly new. What was perhaps new about Luther’s dissent was that it came from within the church. While there may have been some churchmen here are there who sought reform, they were usually lower in the hierarchy and therefore effectively silenced by the central power of the church. Luther, being a monk, was also low in the hierarchy, but he was able to make a fairly large splash with his ideas, perhaps because he voiced his opinion so strongly and loudly. His 95 Theses are actually somewhat gentle toward the papacy;
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This essay was uploaded on 04/11/2008 for the course HIST 110 taught by Professor Hughes during the Fall '07 term at University of Michigan.

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RESPONSE PAPER 10 - RESPONSE PAPER 10 Martin Luther...

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