Simple Quiz #2 - Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA Heidi Klomp Section 13 Simple Quiz#2 Every culture views the world through a different perspective based

Simple Quiz #2 - Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA Heidi Klomp...

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Elizabeth Doud Anthropology TA: Heidi Klomp Section 13 Simple Quiz #2 Every culture views the world through a different perspective, based off of their own personal beliefs and ideas about how the world works, also known as their imaginary world. And yet, as the societies are made up of many individuals, it cannot be expected for all of them to think and act the same. The Himba have their own imaginary world, with their views on how the world works, their beliefs and their customs and traditions meshed together into the lives of each and every Himba, though there are individuals who choose to live or act in a manner that differs from the collective norm. This presence of individual beliefs and ideas can also be seen in the lives of students at BYU and people from societies around the world as they work to maintain a balance between their private beliefs and desires and the the weight of social constraint and the collective imaginary world. One of the most important beliefs in the Himba society is that of ancestor worship. The Himba believe that the spirits of their dead watch over them from beyond the grave. They believe that “without the presence and blessing of the ancestors in their lives. . . provident living from day to day and season to season would be impossible” (Crandall, 18) Their lives are well because the ancestors bless and protect them, as seen with Vita's daughter. According to the oracle, an angry man had worked medicine to poison Vita's wife's milk, in order to hurt Vita through the death of his child. The ancestors had suppressed the girl's desire for breast milk in order to save her (Crandall, 67). However, the Himba do not expect that they will be protected without action on their part, offering sacrifices and gifts as a sign of remembrance to their ancestors. In the case of Vita's daughter, his “deceased fathers asked that a sheep be sacrificed. . . [in] humble acknowledgment of their blessing hand” (Crandall, 67). While the blessings of the ancestors are a gift from Mukuru , the Himba's deity, there is also evil in the world. Omiti is medicine that is “employed by someone consumed with enmity toward the
victim” (Crandall, 39). The Himba believe that there is no such thing as a natural death, instead it is understood that the deceased was a victim of malicious intent. They go to great lengths to try and avoid being cursed by those who wish them harm. Great care is taken to hide away those objects such as the umbilical cord of a newborn and the bones of their “sheep of sin” (Crandall, 117) that are known to be connected with the body, because “whatever harm is done to them will surely find its way into the body and cause it to sicken, wither, and die” (Crandall, 67-68). Another evil is that of independent spirits, those that cannot be driven off by the power of the ancestor. It is these spirits that send the Himba looking for those of non-Himba traditions, “for these powerful spirits were impervious to Himba medical practice” (Crandal, 167).

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