Model Intro and Model Paper 1

Model Intro and Model Paper 1 - A Good Set Up The...

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A Good Set Up The advancement of women’s rights is and has been an ongoing fight throughout history. It is almost common knowledge that the fight for women’s rights in politics has been a struggle. But what a lot of people fail to realize is that when it comes to the progression of women’s rights women have to overcome male dominance in whatever they did, whether it was voting, deciding to get a job other than taking care of kids all day, or something as simple as playing basketball. When basketball was invented, like most sports at the time, it was created so young men could play it, not women. However, this didn’t stop the young ladies at the time from “getting their hands dirty,” and venture into territories that would normally be inhabited by men. Since women began to play the game in 1892 they had to overcome great adversities in order not only to play the game, but to play the game how they wanted.
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A Model Paper Repeating History Few remember learning about the pandemic of 1918 when over 675,000 people in the United States died from the Spanish flu. With between 20 and 40 million deaths worldwide, the United States was the least devastated of the countries affected. Nonetheless, more Americans died as a result of Spanish influenza than due to World War I, World War II, the Korean War, and the Vietnam War combined. But America has mostly forgotten about the tragic events that occurred. This is worrisome because history may now repeat itself with the emergence of today’s Avian flu. Similarities have surfaced in the preparation and handling of the early staged of Spanish influenza and the current avian flu, a possible pandemic. The 1918 Spanish influenza was devastating. Within twenty-four hours a healthy person could die from the virus. Severe aches and weaknesses occurred in muscles and joints, and fevers reached as high as 105 degrees, which caused hallucinations for many. Bleeding from the eyes, ears, mouth, and nose were also common symptoms. If untreated, pneumonia could result. Post- influenza depression affected many who survived (“Among the Victims”). In addition, during the late stages of the pandemic, many people were afraid to gather in groups for fear of infection. According to one survivor, the flu “destroyed all family and community life” (Barry 297). Spanish influenza appeared as early as March 1918 and was disastrous in Europe by that summer, but the general public in America did not learn about the severity of the outbreak until late September 1918, just one month before the pandemic’s peak in the United States.
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Information entering the United States concerning Spanish influenza was censored due to World War I. The government did not want the public to be concerned about influenza, as the public was already stressed about the news of violence in the war. America’s Surgeon Genergal Rupert
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course COMP 105 taught by Professor Bidell during the Winter '07 term at University of Michigan.

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Model Intro and Model Paper 1 - A Good Set Up The...

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