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EES 108 Class 17 - Types of clouds High Fog >6 km(20,000 ft...

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Types of clouds High:  >6 km (20,000 ft) Optically thin Ice crystals No precipitation Middle: 2-6 km (6500-20,000 ft) Water droplets Little precipitation Low: <2 km (6500 ft) Optically thick Water droplets Precipitation  Fog: Ground level Vertical development Tall:  Start low,  reach middle/high Water and ice Precipitation Violent storms
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Cloud types
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Wave (lenticular) clouds
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Lenticular Clouds
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Lenticular clouds
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Lenticular clouds
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Lenticular clouds
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What makes fog? Cool air to dewpoint Radiation Advection Conduction/Convection Lifting  “Upslope fog” Raise dewpoint Steam Fog Frontal Fog
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Radiation Fog
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Upslope fog Warm moist air flows up sloping surface (mountains) Rocky mountains, Appalachians  Adiabatic or diabatic? Why?
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Up-slope fog
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Advection fog Advection =  horizontal  movement of air Carrying heat and/or moisture from one place  to another
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