Essay1 - Shannon Gallaway HIS 108-032 Shannon Gallaway HIS 108-032 Colonists and Indians Life in a New World Although you would think the colonists and

Essay1 - Shannon Gallaway HIS 108-032 Shannon Gallaway HIS...

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Shannon Gallaway HIS 108-032 Shannon Gallaway HIS 108-032 Colonists and Indians: Life in a New World Although you would think the colonists and Indians would have lives that followed an intersecting course, it was more of a parallel course. They were each struggling to adapt and conform to a new world in the seventeenth-century. While both Native Americans and Europeans were a part of a greater imperial world, they also experienced the feeling of living in a new world and at the same time incorporated their old cultures into it. The Indians and Europeans experienced parallel courses when developing in a new world. The Indians specifically experienced ecological and epidemiological changes. Both Europeans and Indians experienced economic changes, interactions, disputes, and the spread of a new religion. The natives experienced a new world just as much as the Europeans did when they came to the colonies. Even though the natives did not physically move to a new land, they experienced change that would affect their culture forever. They had to adjust to the fact that new people now were living on the land that they never had to share before. These people, the Europeans, brought a culture that was extremely foreign to the Native Americans and caused changes to their culture. The changes the Europeans brought with them affected the environment, economy, and the Indians’ health. “This trio of economic, ecological, and epidemiological forces“ (41) changed the natives’ country into a new world. Richter stresses this fluctuating material culture. He explains that wherever the colonists settled it “reordered native economies but dramatically reshaped native cultures in ways beyond European control or comprehension” (41). The ecological transformation happened due to the Europeans coming to the colonies. The Europeans overhunted the beaver to the point of “temporary regional extinctions” (53), introduced new livestock such as hogs, and over-farmed the land. The beavers were hunted for 1
[Type text] [Type text] [Type text] the fur trade, which was extremely important to the economy. Beavers were new to the Europeans and their fur made them money, which is why they hunted it so much to the point of regional extinction. The ecological effect was huge, since beavers were not in the regions to create dams; there was “increased water flows, and thus soil erosion, which destroyed complicated habitats” (54). The hunting of the beavers affected the “environment in complicated and unpredictable ways” (53). Introducing hogs to the culture “symbolizes the economic and ecological incompatibility of European and Native American agriculture” (97). Many of the hogs would destroy the natives’ crops because they did not fence them. The Indians thought the hogs

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