The Rifle and Blind Chinese Soldiers

The Rifle and Blind Chinese Soldiers - "Blind Chinese...

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“Blind Chinese Soldiers” (1946) by Hirabayashi Taiko - The literary technique prevalent in the story – “de-familialization,” an artistic technique (thus its application is not limited to literature) that forces the reader/audience/viewer to see a familiar image of things in an unusual way; an artistic technique to shed new light on something commonly understood by people and to change their perception of it. - The tonality of the story can be described as literary realism and/or objectivism grounded largely on impersonal as well as reporting perspectives; the narrator’s emotion as “the wasteful mental vacuum” created by his encounter with the prince (183). - What are de-familialized? Prince Takamatsu – his presence is recognized almost like an epiphany since he was “an existence hitherto believed to be fictitious” (183). The following car full of people imbued with dirtiness and confusion and the soldiers with an unbearable smell (183-184); then, these Chinese soldiers are blind (184); the number of the soldiers (approximately 500)
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course MODL 398 taught by Professor Amano during the Spring '08 term at UNL.

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The Rifle and Blind Chinese Soldiers - "Blind Chinese...

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