The Bears of Nametoko and Carp

The Bears of Nametoko and Carp - "The Bears of...

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“The Bears of Nametoko” (1927) by Miyazawa Kenji 1) The narrative form: The first person narrative that tells a story derived from other people’s saying or what s/he interpreted from what was heard (103). 2) Bringing provincial and local elements: the names of mountains, valleys, and the local hunter etc. 3) The hunter Kojuro Fukuchizawa reflects a socio-economic reality that has been less discussed in the previous readings: ‘Don’t think I killed you, Bear, because I hated you. I have to make a living, just as you have to be shot. I’d like to different work, work with no sin attached, but I’ve got no fields, and they say my trees belong to the authorities, and when I go into the village nobody will have anything to do with me. I’m a hunter because I can’t help it. It’s fate that made you a bear, and it’s fate that makes me do this work. Make sure you’re not reborn as a bear next time!’ Explicate the above statement by Kojuro: what other elements are embedded there? Also, later on page 107, Kojuro’s economic difficulty with his large
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course MODL 398 taught by Professor Amano during the Spring '08 term at UNL.

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The Bears of Nametoko and Carp - "The Bears of...

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