English jane eyre paper - Sophia Englehardt G English Draft 2 It's often said that one's childhood shapes who they are as an adult and what they do not

English jane eyre paper - Sophia Englehardt G English Draft...

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Sophia Englehardt G English Draft 2 It's often said that one's childhood shapes who they are as an adult, and what they do not accomplish or acquire as a child, they will fulfill later on in life. Almost as if your adulthood is just an extension of your childhood experiences. In Jane Eyre by Charlotte Bronte, Jane wants to be able to have a very important quality to life that she didn't obtain in her childhood. She wants to be proud of what she's made of herself, and therefor, genuinely happy; however, this is much easier said than done. Jane has gone through a drastic change throughout the story, that is noticeable to the reader. Chapter 21 demonstrates how Jane has moved on from her troubled past as a child while living at the Reeds house by her maturity and true independence. This chapter is a good example of this because it shows how Jane has not only accepted her past but also moved on. She shows this by coming all the way to see her aunt, who is near death, to apologize for her wrongdoings and acting out as a child; although she rarely did, and more often than not took blame for the mishaps. Despite the fact that Mrs. Reed kept John Eyre's letter hidden from Jane, she still persists to forgive Mrs. Reed. Jane's sincere apology of her own volition shows how much she has moved on from her sad childhood while living at Mrs. Reed's and developed into a wise, intelligent, and mature adult. Mrs. Reeds bitterness and acridity towards Jane as a child do not affect Jane's abiding want to apologize for what little harm she had done. During Jane's first arrival at Gateshead while visiting her sick aunt, she introduces herself to Mrs. Reed and is immediately greeted with a livid response. Mrs. Reed is very sick so she's somewhat delirious of who she's talking to when she gets worked up after hearing the name Jane Eyre. She says to Jane, “What did they do with her at Lowood? The ever broke out there, and many of the pupils died. She, however, did not die: but I said she did—I wish she had

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