Man�y�shū � Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves

Man�y�shū � Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves

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Man’yōshū – The Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves - The oldest existing collection of Japanese poetry - The compilation by Ōtomo no Yakamochi was completed sometimes after 759 A.D. - The collection includes poems composed between mid 5 th century and mid 8 th century. - Contains 265 chōka (long poems: 5-7,5-7,5-7, 5-7-7), one tanrenga (short connecting poem), and 4,207 tanka (short poems: 5-7-5, 7-7). - “Envoy” – a short, complementary poem that summarizes or helps articulate a preceding long poem (syllable patterns follow that of tanka. ) - Written in manyōgana – the writing system uses Chinese characters to represent Japanese syllables phonetically; this writing system became the foundation of the modern syllabic kana ( hiragana, katakana ) writing systems. - Many of the poems are anonymously composed or misattributed usually to well-known poets. - Authors – emperors, aristocrats, lower-class government officials, soldiers, and common people etc. - Surrogate composition – writing a poem in place of someone else was a
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course MODL 398 taught by Professor Amano during the Spring '08 term at UNL.

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Man�y�shū � Collection of Ten Thousand Leaves

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