REVIEWED MDCII MODULE 1_072621 (1).docx - Ticket to Class...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 43 pages.

Ticket to Class Weeks 1, 2, & 3Define cellular regulation?Cellular regulation is the genetic and physiologic processes that control cellular growth, replication, differentiation, and function to maintain homeostasis. Define Immunity?protects the body from foreign invaders and non-self-cellsDefine Mitosis? Mitosis makes one cell divide into two new cells that are identical to each other and to the cell that began mitosis. Define Neoplasia? Any new or continued cell growth not needed for normal development or replacement of dead and damaged tissuesIn relation to the biology of normal cells….Define Specific morphology?Specific morphology is the feature in which each normal cell typehas a distinct and recognizable appearance, size, and shape. Define a small nuclear-to-cytoplasmic ratio? means that the nucleus of a normal cell occupies a relatively small amount of space inside the cell.Define differentiated function? Means that every normal cell has at least one function it performs to contribute to whole-body function. For example, skin cells make keratin, liver cells make bile, cardiac muscle cells contract, and red blood cells make hemoglobin.Define Tight Adherence occurs because normal cells make sticky cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) that protrude from the membranes, allowing cells to bind closely and tightly together. Exceptions are blood cellsthat circulate freely as individual cells. Red blood cells and white blood cells produce no CAMs and do not usually adhere together.Define nonmigratorymeans that normal cells do not wander throughout the body (except for blood cells). Normal cells are nonmigratory because they are tightly bound together with CAMs,
which prevents cells from wandering from one tissue into the next. Thus the normal liver does not overgrow and crowd out the space the right kidney should occupy.Defining orderly and well regulated growthby cellular regulation is a very important feature of normal cells. They divide (undergo mitosis) for only two reasons: (1) to develop normal tissueor (2) to replace lost, damaged, or aged normal tissue. Even when they are capable of mitosis, normal cells divide only when body conditions are just right. Cell division (mitosis), occurring ina well-recognized pattern, is described by the cell cycle. Fig. 19.2 shows the phases of the cell cycle. Living cells not actively reproducing are in a reproductive resting state termed G 0. During the G0 period, cells actively carry out their functions but do not divide. Normal cells spend most of their lives in the G0 state rather than in a reproductive state.Define contact inhibition is the part of cellular regulation that stops further rounds of cell division when the dividing cell is completely surrounded and touched (contacted) by other cells.

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture