Chapter 12 review - chapter 13 review Cloud bursting is an application deployment model in which an application runs in a private cloud or data center

Chapter 12 review - chapter 13 review Cloud bursting is an...

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chapter 13 review Cloud bursting is an application deployment model in which an application runs in a private cloud or data center and bursts into a public cloud when the demand for computing capacity spikes. The advantage of such a hybrid cloud deployment is that an organization only pays for extra compute resources when they are needed. cloud mitigation This is the second of two closely-linked reports on the topic of cloud computing. The first report identifies the value proposition, the goals and characteristics of a cloud computing solution. That report also provides an overview of existing cloud computing solutions, including some representative pricing and service level agreements. Throughout this document that report will be referred to as The Cloud Computing Guide. This document identifies the current and planned use of public and private cloud computing solutions. It also identifies the risk associated with cloud computing. The purpose of identifying these risks is not to throw up roadblocks relative to the adoption of cloud computing. That follows in part because relative to cloud computing, the biggest risks accrue to those companies that don't implement any form of cloud computing. It also follows because the identification of the risks associated with cloud computing is intended to enable IT organizations to implement appropriate risk mitigation strategies so that they can implement cloud computing. vendor lock-in Vendor lock-in, or just lock-in, is the situation in which customers are dependent on a single manufacturer or supplier for some product (i.e., a good or service), or products, and cannot move to another vendor without substantial costs and/or inconvenience. This dependency is typically a result of standards that are controlled by the vendor (i.e., manufacturer or supplier). It can grant the vendor some extent of monopoly power and can thus be much more profitable than would be the absence of such dependency. The term is commonly used in the computer industry to refer to the situation that can occur due to a lack of compatibility between different hardware, operating systems or file formats. Such incompatibility can be intentional or unintentional. A specific way in which lock-in can be created is by a dominant company developing file formats that make it difficult for its users to convert their data to other formats. It is also wise for the developer to at the same time proclaim that its file formats are standard, and to even participate in standards making organizations. Another technique is the use of vaporware. This is the announcement or even advertising of products which are claimed to be planned or under development but which are never actually supplied. Or if they are supplied, they lack some or many of the promised features and performance. When used by a dominant software company, vaporware can be effective in
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persuading customers not to switch to competitors' products, and it can also be effective in persuading competitors to not try to develop products with similar features and performance.
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