RResponse - a higher socio-economic class are more likely...

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Britton Bixby Reading Response American Culture 11/13/07 In Shame of the Nation, Jonathan Kozol writes of the growing problem of re- segregation in American schools. Kozol cites several reasons, but perhaps the largest factor at play is white privilege. White privilege is the term used to describe the benefits, often hidden or unknown, acquired simply by being white. Those with white privilege often have the benefit of living on more valuable property. While this would seem irrelevant to their schooling, it has very much to do with where these children will go to school. The property tax is critical in funding that district’s school. Inner-city schools are often understaffed or staffed with under qualified teachers. Therefore, those who are born into
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Unformatted text preview: a higher socio-economic class are more likely to stay there, while those from the bottom of the economic ladder have trouble moving upwards. Another factor at play is epistemology. Epistemology is the term describing the nature of knowledge, with reference to its limits and validity. Those in segregated schools acquire knowledge differently. Those in predominantly white schools view a high school education as the stepping stones to a college education, while those in the inner-city feel like they have no chance to succeed after high school, let alone graduate. Inner-city students are denied access to the higher level and AP classes that those at white schools are encouraged to take....
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