Journal 2 - Shaub 1 Journal Analysis of Fitting Objects...

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Shaub 1 Journal Analysis of Fitting Objects Into Holes: On the Development of Spatial Cognition Skills Christie L Shaub Developmental Psychology 212 Mary Winn March 7, 2008
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Shaub 2 People, from generation to generation use the cliché phrase that you can’t hammer a square peg into a round hole. For complex-minded adults, that saying is common sense. However, for an infant who has not yet developed cognitively, it is an idea which is well beyond their understanding. It’s always rather funny to watch an infant try to put a ball into a square hole or vice versa. In order for an infant to grasp the idea that the ball goes in the round hole and the cube goes in the square one, they must develop their spatial perception and their cognitive skills. This mental development process is one that has been studied often in science in order to better understand the human brain and its process. Recently in 2007, Helena Örnkloo and Claes van Hofsten did a study which involved an object manipulation task between and object and an aperture. Their final report was called Fitting Objects into Holes: On the Development of Spatial Cognition Skills. After reviewing previous experiments and studies performed by other researchers, Örnkloo and Claes (2007), developed their own study which involved 69 infants from four different age groups. Some of the areas that they were looking at include, preadjustments performed while moving the objects to the aperture, the action outcome, and the time it took to carry out the task. There were four hypotheses that these two researchers investigated. First, they decided that if infants fit the objects into the aperture by using preadjustments, they should have raised the objects that were presented lying down and turned all objects in such a way that the fitting cross-section was aligned with the aperture. If the infants solved the problem by trial and error, there should be no such tendencies of preadjustments. Also, if the infants solved the problem by trial and error, the number of successes should increase with the amount of time spent trying. Finally, they hypothesized that the choice of hand in picking up objects would be more distinct at the age that these children began solving the object manipulation tasks.
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course PSYCH PY212 taught by Professor Winn during the Spring '08 term at Arcadia University.

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Journal 2 - Shaub 1 Journal Analysis of Fitting Objects...

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