relationships - Shaub 1 Christie Shaub 21 November 2007...

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Shaub 1 Christie Shaub 21 November 2007 Writer’s London East of Acre Lane Characters as a Universal Representation of Teenagers Every single human is different from one another in at least one respect. The need and desire to be different is especially prevalent in teenagers, as it is the age where one tries to identify themselves. As all humans do, teenagers also have their own unique style, personality, attitude, etc. However, universally, a teenager is defined as a juvenile between the onset of puberty and maturity. Teenagers in general must deal with the same harsh realities, struggle with the need to fit in and cope with growing into a confusing and unknown world. Some teenagers are born into harsher situations than others. Some teenagers make good decisions, where others make bad ones. Regardless of these circumstances, at the end of the day, these young people are still only teenagers. In this respect every teenager has millions of other peers across the world to which they can ultimately relate to. In East of Acre Lane, Alex Wheatle writes the story of one specific group of teenagers who happen to live in Brixton at the time of the Brixton Riots. These young people are obviously living in a harsher condition than other teenagers might have faced. One of the reasons his novel is so effective is the fact that each of his
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Shaub 2 characters are very different, yet together they make a complete story. They each struggle with different problems and in turn deal with these problems in many different ways. However, in the end, they are all teenagers in Brixton, living together, struggling together. Each of his characters possesses a quality which many other teenagers can relate to. Even in my own group of friends, teenagers with these qualities are present. The fact that there was someone back home with whom I could relate to Wheatle’s characters made his novel much more personal and understandable. Biscuit, the central character of the novel is a good representation of what many teenagers in many parts of the world are like. His family does not have a very strong foundation and money seems to be the source of their problem. His mother is living as a single-mom and has three children all from different fathers. Especially in America, this is definitely a common sight. He deals with the struggles of a “favorite child” in the family which causes tension between siblings. Alex Wheatle even adds in his interview that this broken family dynamic came from a personal family conflict, proving that the situation is a realistic one. Biscuit, being the oldest male in the house feels a sense of responsibility in helping to support his family and his mother. My friend back home has three siblings and he
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Shaub 3 dropped out of school so that he could work full-time in order to help his mother pay bills. Biscuit may not be working legally, but he works only enough to provide for his family. There are many teenagers as well as adults who resort to illegal
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relationships - Shaub 1 Christie Shaub 21 November 2007...

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