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Name:Class:"Diploma-12"by Dominican University is licensed under CC BY-NC-ND 2.0.Will the 'right' college major get you a job?By Glenn Altschuler2015A common question that most students in college, or preparing to apply for college, get is ‘what do you wantto major in?’ But how much does your major in college truly matter? In this informational text, GlennAltschuler discusses how important the major you choose in college is to your success after college. As youread, take notes on what drives people to choose certain majors in college.A college education provides lots of benefits. Thosebenefits include acquiring skills, identifying interests,learning about others across time and space, andestablishing personal and professional connections.Abundant evidence exists that college graduates aremore mature and self-confident, better citizens,healthier, wealthier and happier than individuals whodo not have an undergraduate degree.As the cost of attendance has skyrocketed, however,students and their parents are focusing more andmore on short-term considerations. Does collegeconstitute a sound financial investment? Will agraduate get a good job with a high salary?College myths and misconceptionsInWill College Pay Off?, Peter Cappelli, a professor of management and director of the Center for HumanResources at the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, draws on existing data on employment andhigher education in the United States to provide some surprising and provocative answers to these questions.In the process, he busts pervasive1myths and misconceptions.Cappelli acknowledges that the average college graduate now earns considerably more than a person with ahigh school degree and that the gap between them is growing.He points out, however, that the “college wage premium,” the difference between the annual and lifetimeearnings of college graduates and those who do not have an undergraduate degree, has been volatile2in theUnited States over time. As recently as the 1960s and the ‘70s, no gap existed. The current gap is higher forworkers who have been out of college longer.[1][5]1.Pervasive(adjective)spreading widely throughout an area or group of people2.Volatile(adjective)able to change rapidly and unpredictably, especialy for the worse1
Cappelli implies that it may well narrow sometime soon.In Italy and China, for example, college grads are no more successful than high school grads in the job market.According to Cappelli, the current labor force is overeducated — a controversial claim at variance withrecommendations by the President’s Council on Jobs and Competitiveness and other organizations dominated

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Academic degree, Bachelor s degree, Peter Cappelli

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