Paradigms - Paradigms of Diversity Objectives To recognize the inappropriateness of over reliance on deficit approaches to explain the diversity of

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Unformatted text preview: Paradigms of Diversity Objectives To recognize the inappropriateness of over reliance on deficit approaches to explain the diversity of human behavior. To recognize that dominant psychological models are not suitable for understanding all populations. To become familiar with four paradigms that can be used to appropriately study human diversity. To learn key terms associated with theoretical approaches to studying human diversity. Evolving Approaches to the Study of Human Diversity Reexamining dominant models in psychology has been a necessary step toward building a new psychology of human diversity. People of color, as well as others who have felt disenfranchised by dominant perspectives in psychology (e.g. women and gays and lesbians) have offered critiques of these perspectives that have served as an impetus for this departure from dominant models. Key definitions Paradigm : An example or model that guides particular thoughts or attitudes; a way of thinking that exists within a particular framework. Worldview: A pattern of beliefs, behavior, and perceptions that is shared by a population based on similar socialization, life experiences, and the cognitive and behavioral patterns that define psychological membership. A predisposition that is heavily dependent on ecological context. Dominant Perspectives in Psychology : Social science paradigms that are based on cultural norms from the majority population. Population-Specific Psychologies (PSPs) PSPs emphasize cultural contexts Focus on understanding a single population rather than on comparative analysis. For populations with a history of oppression, PSPs overlap with sociopolitical perspectives as theorists seek to debunk negative images that rationalize racism, sexism, and other forms of oppression. In reaction to the unstated worldview that undergirds most social science scholarship, feminists and people of color are typically explicit about their frame of reference. Population Specific Paradigm Dow nes, Anne M . W h a t d o fa t w om e n w a n t ? An exploratory in vestig ation of t he in fluen ces of p sychotherapy on the process by w hich fat w om en w ork tow ard a cce p t a n ce of their size and w eig ht. Dissertation Abstract s I nternational: Section B: t he Sciences & Engineering. Vol 62(9-B), Apr 2002, 4215, US: Univ Microfilm s I nternational. This stud y explores t h e p r oce ss b y w h ich a se le ct e d g ro u p of fa t w om e n w ork t o w a rd a p osit iv e a cce p t a n ce of t h e ir size a n d w e ig h t and on the experiences and perspectives of...
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This note was uploaded on 04/09/2008 for the course PSYCHOLOGY Culture an taught by Professor Mcintosh during the Spring '08 term at UNC Charlotte.

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Paradigms - Paradigms of Diversity Objectives To recognize the inappropriateness of over reliance on deficit approaches to explain the diversity of

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