Exam 3 Study Guide

Exam 3 Study Guide - Dr. Sanders MC 2000 Chapter...

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Unformatted text preview: Dr. Sanders MC 2000 Chapter 9Television I. Televisions Golden Age (1948-1958) a. A time of unusually good dramatic programming b. Many factors encouraged original, high-quality drama i. Attracted wealthy, educated viewers who could afford to buy TVs ii. Networks hired playwrights to write original works, since the major motion picture studios refused to allow the plays they owned to be aired by potential competitors iii. Producers had access to up-and-coming Broadway writers, actors, and directors since network programming originated in NYC iv. Most of the TV dramas were performed live because recording hadnt been invented yet and filming was too expensive c. Majority were one hour and even half-hour plays shown in dozens of anthology series with names that included the name of their sponsors d. Women were portrayed as stereotypical housewives. When women left they house, they were still usually subordinate to men. e. Almost all playwrights, producers, actors and directors of the live dramas were white. If minorities even appeared in a show, they were subservient characters such as maids, butlers, cooks, etc. i. The first show to feature an all-black cast ( Amos and Andy ) depicted blacks as ignorant and clownish ii. Roots , the miniseries about slavery had no black producers, writers or directors, but two white actors made more money than the entire black cast combined iii. The success of The Cosby Show led to an increase in black-oriented programs I I. The Origins of Cable Television a. Began in the 1950s as community antenna television (CATV) i. Designed to give viewers in hard-to-reach areas satisfactory reception from their nearest broadcast television stations 1. Valleys, hillsides, and remote rural areas b. CATV became cable television in the 1970s when it began to offer additional signals from distant stations, a service called importation i. Cable was seen as a competitor by the broadcast industry ii. FCC stepped in 1. One of the first FCC rules for cable TV was that cable systems could not duplicate network programs the same day that the network aired them 2. Must-carry rules said that cable systems had to carry all local TV stations within each systems area of coverage c. Cable was built on a simple premise: Most Americans want more TV channels, and they are willing to pay for them d. Cables big period of growth was between 1970 and 1990 i. Successful launch of HBO proved that people would be willing to pay extra for premium channels I I I.Video Recording a. Germans developed videotape during WWII and Ampex Corporation introduced the first videotape recorder (VTR) in 1956 i. Very expensive reel-to-reel models used only by TV stations and production companies b. In 1975, Sony introduced the Betamax, the first videocassette recorder (VCR) i. Used cassette tapes instead of reels ii. JVC introduced the VHS format less than a year later 1. Spawned a major format war 2. VHS eventually won IV. Digital Recording a. DVDs reached the market in 1996 combining the quality and durability of...
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Exam 3 Study Guide - Dr. Sanders MC 2000 Chapter...

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