review3 - Realignment theory also known as the...

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Realignment theory – also known as the “earthquake theory” of political development, american history is a succession of party systems ( similar elections, constituencies), party systems are separated by critical or realigning elections (fights within the two parties, third parties emerge, higher voter turnout), major changes in the party system (stable electoral eras), anticipated by underlying social changes that gradually make the old alignment less relevant, usually triggered by a crisis Critical elections - party systems are separated by critical or realigning elections (fights within the two parties, third parties emerge, higher voter turnout), decisively marking the end of one party system and the beginning of another Single-member, simple plurality system – electoral system in which in the state is divide up into geographic districts, and the candidates who win the most votes within their districts are elected “sore loser” laws – intended to stop "most candidates who lose a primary election from coming back later in the year to run in the general election Party organization – formal structure and organization of a party, most visible activity: national convention, structured like the federal government (national, state, and local organizations), structural framework Party-in-the-electorate – individual attachments to political parties, This line of research emphasizes the electorate’s attachment (or non-attachment) to political parties Party-in-government – elected and appointed officials, party member who hold
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review3 - Realignment theory also known as the...

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