Chapter 5 Notes Part (a).docx - Chapter 5 PLANNING YOUR...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 10 pages.

Chapter 5 PLANNING YOUR RESEARCHWith so much information online these days, it is tempting just to punch some keywords into a searchengine and then grab something from the first screen or two of results. However, this haphazardapproach limits your effectiveness and can lead to expensive and embarrassing mistakes.To maximize your chances of finding useful information and minimize the time you spend looking for it,start byfamiliarizing yourself with the subject so that you can frame insightful questions. As you explorethe general subject area, try to identify basic terminology, significant trends, important conflicts,influential people, and potential sources of information. Next,develop a problem statement that willdefine the purpose of your research. Thisstatement should explicitly define the decision you need tomake or the conclusion you need to reach at the end of the process. For example, a retailer might wantto know whether consumers are starting to turn away from bottled water because of concerns aboutcost and the environmental impact of plastic packaging and transportation. The problem statementcould be “We need to determine whether we should reduce the number or variety of bottled waterbrands carried in our stores.” Before you begin your research project, recognize that research carriessome significant ethical responsibilities. To avoid ethical lapses, keep the following points in mind:● Don’t force a specific outcome by skewing your research.● Respect the privacy of your research participants.● Document sources and give appropriate credit.● Respect intellectual property rights , the ownership of unique ideas that have commercialvalue in the marketplace. 2● Don’t distort information from your sources.● Don’t misrepresent who you are or what you intend to do with the research results.In addition to ethics, research etiquette deserves careful attention. For example, respect the time ofanyone who agrees to be interviewed or to be a research participant, and maintain courtesy throughoutthe interview or research process.TARGET INFORMATION GAPSRESEARCH PRIORITIESCONDUCTING SECONDARY RESEARCHEven if you intend to eventually conduct primary research, start with a review of anyavailable secondary research. Inside your company, you might be able to fi nd a variety ofreports and other documents that could help. Outside the company, business researcherscan choose from a wide range of print and online resources, both in libraries and online.Table 11.5 provides a small sample of the many secondary resources available.
EVALUATING SOURCESNo matter where you’re searching, it is your responsibility to separate quality information fromunreliable junk, so you don’t taint your results or damage your reputation. Web 2.0 tools havecomplicated this challenge by making many new sources of information available. On thepositive side, independent sources communicating through blogs, Twitter and other

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 10 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Spring
Professor
N/A
Tags
Web search engine

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture