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Unformatted text preview: “If you want to understand and engage in the practice and scholarship of this new field of sustainable HRM, read this book. With lucid prose and strong grounding in the academic literature, Sugumar Mariappanadar provides detailed discussions of the challenges facing proponents of sustainable economic development worldwide and offers practical examples of the steps being taken to improve our common future. It’s the best book of its kind available today.” —Susan E. Jackson, Rutgers University, USA “This is a comprehensive book that will enhance your understanding and enable you to design and implement HRM practices for achieving organizational financial performance without compromising on stakeholders’ wellbeing. It illustrates various domains of Sustainable HRM with sound theories to shape HRM practices with proorganizational, social and environmental values.” —Klaus J. Zink, University of Kaiserslautern, Germany Sugumar Mariappanadar guides readers with clarity of purpose and direction through and beyond the layers of controversy – and opportunity – that HRM thinking and practices labelled as ‘sustainable’ can offer. The author’s open and engaging style draws readers in, informs them comprehensively about strategic contexts for sustainable HRM, and allows them spaces to reflect critically on their own values in relation to current HRM practice and research. With this book, Dr Mariappanadar will both prompt and satisfy the curiosity of students and of practitioners of HRM as they prepare for an increasingly complex future. —Keith Jackson, SOAS University of London, UK; Kobe University, Japan “This inspirational book makes an exciting scholarly contribution to an increasingly important debate on the intersection between the management of human resources and 1 the creation of sustainable organisations. Expertly analysed, it will appeal to students, scholars, policy makers and the wider business and social science community”. —Thomas Lange, Middlesex University, UK “Sugumar Mariappanadar has written a thoughtful and strategic book which will certainly become essential reading in its field. It marries high level incisive scholarship with enlightening cases of companies which have adopted proactive policies in term of HRM sustainability. I am sure it will generate many new ideas about the manner to sustainably conduct people management, in itself a key element in achieving global sustainability” —Philippe Debroux, Soka University, Japan 2 MANAGEMENT, WORK AND ORGANISATIONS Series editors: Gibson Burrell, School of Management, University of Leicester, UK , Manchester Business School, University of Manchester and Strathclyde Business School, University of Strathclyde, UK , Strathclyde Business School, University of Strathclyde, UK Mick Marchington Paul Thompson This series of textbooks covers the areas of human resource management, employee relations, organisational behaviour and related business and management fields. Each text has been specially commissioned to be written by leading experts in a clear and accessible way. The books contain serious and challenging material, take an analytical rather than prescriptive approach and are particularly suitable for use by students with no prior specialist knowledge. The series is relevant for many business and management courses, including MBA and post-experience courses, specialist masters and postgraduate diplomas, professional courses and final-year undergraduate courses. These texts have become essential reading at business and management schools worldwide. Titles include: Maurizio Atzeni WORKERS AND LABOUR IN A GLOBALISED CAPITALISM Stephen Bach and Ian Kessler THE MODERNISATION OF THE PUBLIC SERVICES AND EMPLOYEE RELATIONS Emma Bell READING MANAGEMENT AND ORGANIZATION IN FILM Paul Blyton and Peter Turnbull THE DYNAMICS OF EMPLOYEE RELATIONS (3rd edition) Paul Blyton, Edmund Heery and Peter Turnbull (editors) REASSESSING THE EMPLOYMENT RELATIONSHIP Sharon C. Bolton EMOTION MANAGEMENT IN THE WORKPLACE Sharon C. Bolton and Maeve Houlihan (editors) SEARCHING FOR THE HUMAN IN HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Peter Boxall and John Purcell STRATEGY AND HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT (4th edition) J. Martin Corbett CRITICAL CASES IN ORGANISATIONAL BEHAVIOUR Susan Corby, Steve Palmer and Esmond Lindop 3 RETHINKING REWARD David Farnham THE CHANGING FACES OF EMPLOYMENT RELATIONS Ian Greener PUBLIC MANAGEMENT (2nd edition) Keith Grint LEADERSHIP Irena Grugulis SKILLS, TRAINING AND HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT Geraldine Healy, Gill Kirton and Mike Noon (editors) EQUALITY, INEQUALITIES AND DIVERSITY Damian Hodgson and Svetlana Cicmil (editors) MAKING PROJECTS CRITICAL Marek Korczynski HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT IN SERVICE WORK Karen Legge HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT: ANNIVERSARY EDITION Patricia Lewis and Ruth Simpson (editors) GENDERING EMOTIONS IN ORGANIZATIONS Patricia Lewis and Ruth Simpson (editors) VOICE, VISIBILITY AND THE GENDERING OF ORGANIZATIONS Sugumar Mariappanadar SUSTAINABLE HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT Alison Pullen, Nic Beech and David Sims (editors) EXPLORING IDENTITY Jill Rubery and Damian Grimshaw THE ORGANISATION OF EMPLOYMENT Hugh Scullion and Margaret Linehan (editors) INTERNATIONAL HUMAN RESOURCE MANAGEMENT John Walton and Claire Valentin (editors) HUMAN RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT For more information on titles in the Series please go to 4 Sustainable Human Resource Management Strategies, Practices and Challenges Sugumar Mariappanadar 5 6 © Sugumar Mariappanadar, under exclusive licence to Springer Nature Limited 2019 All rights reserved. No reproduction, copy or transmission of this publication may be made without written permission. No portion of this publication may be reproduced, copied or transmitted save with written permission or in accordance with the provisions of the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988, or under the terms of any licence permitting limited copying issued by the Copyright Licensing Agency, Saffron House, 6–10 Kirby Street, London EC1N 8TS. Any person who does any unauthorized act in relation to this publication may be liable to criminal prosecution and civil claims for damages. The author has asserted his right to be identified as the author of this work in accordance with the Copyright, Designs and Patents Act 1988. First published 2019 by RED GLOBE PRESS Red Globe Press in the UK is an imprint of Springer Nature Limited, registered in England, company number 785998, of 4 Crinan Street, London, N1 9XW. Red Globe Press® is a registered trademark in the United States, the United Kingdom, Europe and other countries. ISBN 978–1–137–53049–3 Softcover This book is printed on paper suitable for recycling and made from fully managed and sustained forest sources. Logging, pulping and manufacturing processes are expected to conform to the environmental regulations of the country of origin. A catalogue record for this book is available from the British Library. A catalog record for this book is available from the Library of Congress. 7 It takes a village to raise a child – An African proverb I dedicate this book to the memory of my mother and father and to my brothers and sisters for their endless contributions and sacrifices in developing the person I am today. My lovely wife, Valsa, who believed in me and supported me during challenging times to complete this book. Our two beautiful daughters, Tara and Dipti, who made me constantly believe that I can accomplish this piece of work. Last but not least, to all my friends who facilitated my critical thinking to perceive the world differently. 8 Contents List of figures and tables Acknowledgements List of contributors and biographies Part I Introduction to Sustainable HRM 1 Human resource management in the twenty-first century: Sustainable HRM Sugumar Mariappanadar 1.1 1.2 1.3 What is human resources? Traditional human resource management Challenges for strategic HRM in the twenty-first century 1.4 Sustainable HRM 1.5 Corporate sustainability and sustainable HRM 1.6 The importance of sustainable HRM for the twentyfirst century 1.7 Barriers to sustainable HRM 1.8 Conclusion References Part II Framing Sustainable HRM 2 Institutional contexts for developing sustainable HRM Sugumar Mariappanadar 2.1 Introduction 2.2 Macro-level institutional contexts 2.3 Background for meso- and micro-level contexts 2.4 Conclusion References 3 A paradox perspective for sustainable Human Resource Management 9 Christine Parkin Hughes 3.1 Introduction 3.2 Tension between sustainability and HRM 3.3 The paradox perspective 3.4 Key organisational paradoxes 3.5 Key paradoxes for HRM 3.6 Strategies to cope with paradox 3.7 Conclusion References Part III Developing Values and Strategies for Sustainable HRM 4 Sustainable HRM practices: Values and characteristics Sugumar Mariappanadar 4.1 4.2 4.3 Introduction Organizational values for sustainable HRM Characteristics of control and strategic HRM systems 4.4 Characteristics of business strategy for sustainable development 4.5 Organizational design and process characteristics of sustainable HRM 4.6 Sustainable HRM strategies 4.7 Characteristics of sustainable HRM practices 4.8 Paradoxes or tensions between using strategic and sustainable HRM practice 4.9 Conclusion References 5 Sustainable HRM theories: Simultaneous benefits for organizations and stakeholders Sugumar Mariappanadar 5.1 5.2 5.3 5.4 5.5 5.6 5.7 Introduction Perspectives of simultaneous effects of HRM practices Theory of negative externality of HRM The theory of harm of work The costs framework for harm of HRM practices The theory of synthesis effects of HRM practices Conclusion 10 References 6 Sustainable HRM for environmental management: Green HRM Sugumar Mariappanadar 6.1 6.2 6.3 6.4 6.5 Introduction Background on environmental management system The role of HRM in environmental management system Green HRM A framework of synthesis of green HRM for environmental sustainability 6.6 Conclusion References Part IV Sustainable HRM: Implementation, Measurement and Reporting 7 Implementing sustainable HRM practices Sugumar Mariappanadar 7.1 7.2 7.3 Introduction A framework of typologies of sustainable HRM Embedding characteristics of sustainable HRM typologies to HRM functions 7.4 A scheme of classification of sustainable HRM for corporate sustainability 7.5 Resource regeneration strategy for sustainable work performance 7.6 Overcoming barriers to implementing sustainable HRM practices 7.7 Paradoxes in implementing strategic and sustainable HRM practices 7.8 Conclusion References 8 Bridging sustainable HRM theory and practice: The Respect, Openness and Continuity model Peggy De Prins 8.1 The triple P translated: Introduction of the ROC model 8.2 First sustainable HRM block: Respect 8.3 Second sustainable HRM block: Openness 11 8.4 Third sustainable HRM block: Continuity 8.5 Summary and conclusions References 9 Measurements for sustainable HRM practices Sugumar Mariappanadar 9.1 Introduction 9.2 Measurements for sustainable HRM 9.3 Measures for the harm of work 9.4 Measure for sustainable leadership 9.5 Measure for green HRM practices 9.6 Conclusion References 10 Sustainability reporting and sustainable HRM Elaine Cohen, Iris Maurer, Sugumar Mariappanadar and Michael Müller-Camen 10.1 10.2 10.3 10.4 Introduction Sustainability reporting by corporations The global reporting initiative framework From reporting standards to the assessment of sustainability performance 10.5 Current sustainable HRM theories to enrich performance indicators of GRI 10.6 Conclusion References Part V Developing the Future of Sustainable HRM 11 Sustainable HRM roles and competencies Sugumar Mariappanadar and Robin Kramar 11.1 11.2 11.3 11.4 11.5 11.6 Introduction Introduction to HR roles and HR competencies Strategic HR roles and competencies Sustainable HR roles and competencies Types of sustainable HR roles Rationale for the integration and fusion of sustainable HR roles 11.7 Competencies for sustainable HR roles 11.8 Competencies for integration and fusion of sustainable HR roles 12 11.9 Conclusion References 12 Global sustainable HRM practices Robin Kramar and Sugumar Mariappanadar 12.1 12.2 12.3 Introduction Globalisation and multinational enterprises Limitations of strategic HRM in addressing stakeholders’ expectations 12.4 Global sustainable HRM 12.5 Transference and implementation of global sustainable HRM 12.6 Conclusion References Index 13 List of figures and tables Figures 1.1 2.1 2.2 2.3 3.1 4.1 4.2 5.1 5.2 6.1 7.1 7.2 7.3 8.1 11.1 Synthesis paradox framework of sustainable HR An institutional contexts framework for sustainable HRM A macro-level contexts model for sustainable HRM A sample materiality matrix with key issues for developing the focus of sustainable HRM Strategies to manage tensions. An integrated model of sustainable HRM system Possible paradoxes created due to different organizational values between strategic and sustainable HRM practices in organization decision making A framework of sustainable HRM theories from the harm of work and the synthesis effects perspectives The costs framework for harm of HRM practices The framework of synthesis of green HRM for environmental sustainability A configurational model of job contexts for the typologies of sustainable HRM A scheme of classification of sustainable HRM (after Gollan & Xu’s (2014) framework) Sustainable work performance framework (after Dorenbosch, 2014) The Respect Openness Continuity (ROC) model of sustainable HRM 9.1 The role of measurements in facilitating sustainable HRM practices Link between sustainable HRM characteristics and sustainable HR roles for sustainable HRM performance outcomes 14 11.2 Rationale behind the role identity construction for sustainable HR Tables 2.1 2.2 4.1 4.2 7.1 8.1 9.1 9.2 9.3 10.1 10.2 11.1 11.2 12.1 Key definitions for understanding GRI reporting as a context for developing sustainable HRM The ten UN Global Compact principles Definition for sustainable organisational values Characteristics of control, strategic and sustainable HRM system List of typologies of sustainable HRM practices Theoretical antecedents and overview of practical approaches to implementing sustainable HRM The stakeholder harm of work index Items for the health harm of work scale Items for the social harm of work scale GRI disclosures and performance indicators and HRM relevance HRM-related indicators of B-corp and economy of the common good Dedicated sustainable HR roles and Competencies Integrated and fusion of sustainable HR roles and competencies Definition of ethical values relevant for global sustainable HRM 15 Acknowledgements I am indebted to Swinburne University of Technology for funding my early years of research in the field of sustainable HRM, and for the funding and support I subsequently received from Australian Catholic University to pursue my research in this field. I acknowledge Ina Aust’s contribution for rekin-dling my research passion in the field of sustainable HRM in 2009, and for her initial input into the proposal of this book to the publisher, Macmillan. I am fortunate that some of the International Sustainable HRM Network members subsequently joined me in revising the original book proposal and assisted me in completing the book, in particular Professor Robin Kramar, Professor Michael Muller-Camen, Professor Peggy De Prins and Dr. Christine P. Hughes. I have benefited immensely from Robin’s expert guidance in the writing journey of completing this book. I thank Ursula Gavin, Editor, and Peter Atkinson and the editorial team of Macmillan for their continued support in completing this book. Finally, I have learned and benefited considerably from critical and encouraging comments from international reviewers of the book chapters. 16 List of contributors and biographies Dr. Sugumar Mariappanadar Sugumar Mariappanadar, is a member of the Centre for Sustainable HRM and Wellbeing, Peter Faber Business School, Australian Catholic University, Australia. He has published many journal articles in the field of sustainable HRM since 2003. He has also designed and teaches sustainable HRM as a course in both the postgraduate and undergraduate programs. Professor Robin Kramar Robin Kramar is an Adjunct Professor at the University of Notre Dame, Sydney. She has a commitment to improving the employee experience in the workplace and has done research in this area for more than forty years. Professor Michael Müller-Camen Michael Müller-Camen is Professor of Human Resource Management at Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU), Professor (part-time) of International Human Resource Management at Middlesex University Business School, London and Distinguished Professor at the Open University of Hong Kong. Michael has developed a reputation as one of the leading academics in the newly emerging areas of Sustainable HRM and Green HRM. 17 Dr. Peggy De Prins Peggy De Prins holds a PhD in social sciences. Since the early nineties she has been conducting scientific research in the area of HRM and labour sociol-ogy. Key subjects in her research are sustainable HRM, labour relations and employee engagement. She is currently employed as associate professor at the Antwerp Management School (Belgium). Dr. Christine Parkin Hughes Christine Parkin Hughes currently works at the Business School, University of Exeter as the Programme Director: DA Chartered Manager, and BSc Applied Business Management. Christine’s research interests centre on sustainable and responsible business with a focus on the human factor. Elaine Cohen Elaine Cohen, is a CSR Consultant and Sustainability Reporter based in Israel. Elaine contributes to the community as a Board Member of a Women’s Empowerment nonprofit and offering sustainability services to nonprofits. Iris Maurer Iris Maurer is a Teaching and Research Associate at the Institute for Human Resource Management at Vienna University of Economics and Business (WU). Iris’ research interests include Sustainability Reporting and Sustainable Human Resource Management. 18 part I Introduction to Sustainable HRM Introduction I am engaged in my job, passionate about my career and committed to the organization. However, I am progressively struggling with increased physical and mental tiredness, work-life imbalance due to my work related commitments to improve organizational performance. Also, I am not sure how as a non-specialized environmental management employee I can contribute to ecosystem sustainability. Hence, I more often feel that my life happiness and enjoyment are not complete. – A common dilemma encountered by employees in the modern workplace Can you or your family and friends, as employees, relate to the stated work– life–environment dilemma and the irreversible consequences the dilemma has on you, your family, the natural environment and society? Stop thinking that you and your family and friends have personally not done enough to cope with the work–life– environment dilemma. Start thinking what you, as an agent of an organization, can do more of at the organizational level to benefit the ecosystem as well as to enhance employees’ quality of life both within the workplace and outside of work. This book aims to help HR and management professionals, including academics, researchers and practitioners at all levels in an organization, to act as ‘agents’ in order to make the workplace environmentally sustainable and 19 enhance stakeholders’ (employees, their families, society etc.,) well-being while simultaneously attempting to improve organizational performance. Strategic HRM has made a significant contribution in offering a mental schema for HR and management professionals. This schema engages HR as a human capital to gain competitive advantage for the organization and contribute to shareholders’ benefits. However, stakeholders’ growing pro-social and sustainable environmental expectations have become major disrup-tors to the current dominant business strategy...
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