Sociology Paper 6

Sociology Paper 6 - William Fonda Intro to Sociology...

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William Fonda 5/7/2009 Intro to Sociology Applying Sociology Paper Opportunity 6 Karl Marx Comes to SHU – Social Stratification On Campus When one thinks of the term “social stratification,” several images come to mind. Karl Marx. Agrarian workers toiling in the fields under the hot sun. Lords and Ladies sitting in castles being waited upon day and night by servants. Masters whipping slaves who cannot work fast enough. All of these images are prime examples of social stratification. However, another more subtle example exists – the example of Seton Hall University itself. In the social circles and interactions of the student body of Seton Hall University, all three major analyses of social stratification – Structural-Functional, Social-Conflict, and Symbolic-Interaction – can be observed. According to the Davis-Moore thesis, “social stratification has beneficial consequences for the operation of a society” (Macionis 214). This is to say that social stratification actually serves a functional purpose that makes society better, because it encourages people to work harder to achieve a better social standing in society. In society at large, this analysis can be seen in the way that people attach “rewards” to high social standing, and then will be willing to work harder to achieve that standing and get those “rewards” (Macionis 214). This same idea is clearly visible at Seton Hall University. In my personal experience, one of my suitemates is pledging to be in a fraternity, although I cannot for the life of me remember which fraternity it is. My
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Sociology Paper 6 - William Fonda Intro to Sociology...

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