Entomology daily log

Entomology daily log - Bug in a Cup Project Daniel Miller...

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Bug in a Cup Project Daniel Miller 904571789 Introduction: My objectives for this project are to raise at least one of my milkweed nymphs to maturity and while doing so, learn all about their metamorphosis. A goal of mine is to notice the differences in their anatomy in each instar. I also want to learn the different behaviors they have throughout their lives. Methods My method for raising my bugs is very simple yet adequate. I will make sure their cotton ball is always moist with water and that there are always seeds for them to feed on. I will clean out their cup whenever it appears to be dirty for whatever reason. I will make sure that the insects have a large enough home to move freely without being cramped. I will keep them away from any windows so they avoid any drafts or sudden changes in temperature. I will keep them in a low stress environment, like my bedroom, to increase their ability to survive. My methods for observing them will vary throughout their life. When they are young, I will try to observe their social behaviors and feeding habits. As they mature, I will try to observe those same things, as well as their use of all their appendages and the changes in their anatomy after each molt. I will also observe them in and out of their
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cup as well as with and without other bugs to see if their behavior changes when their environment changes. I will avoid doing anything with the bugs that could jeopardize their lives. Other than that, I will just try to observe the bug’s everyday life and their unique behaviors. Milkweed Daily Journal: January, Wednesday 23 I picked up my Bug-in-a-cup and noted that there were 4 bugs in the cup. They both had red bodies, black heads, and were extremely small. I would say they were about the size of a pin head at best. There were some sunflower seeds in the cup along with a wet cotton ball looking thing. I can see small antennae on them. The first thing I did when I brought the cup home was test the cotton ball to see if it was moist and noticed it was quite dry. So I put several drops of water on it and noticed the bugs were crawling all over the cotton ball. I’m assuming they were drinking the water, but I couldn’t see anything because they are so small and their mouthparts are extremely small. January, Thursday 24 The bugs appear to be about the same size. They are moving around a lot more today. Their antennae were more noticeable today because they were using them more
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because they were moving so much. They were on the lid of the cup the majority of the time I was observing them. I let them out of the cup for a minute today to see how they would behave out of their confinements. They didn’t stick together or even remotely close to each other, instead they started wandering all around in random directions. I had to quickly scoop them all back up so that they didn’t become lost. January, Friday 25
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Entomology daily log - Bug in a Cup Project Daniel Miller...

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