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See discussions, stats, and author profiles for this publication at: A Hypervisor for Embedded Computing Article · January 2007 CITATIONS 3 READS 387 5 authors , including: Some of the authors of this publication are also working on these related projects: SIFT PROJECT View project Trustworthy Infrastructure for the Power Grid (TCIP) Information Trust Institute Illinois View project Ellick Chan Stanford University 29 PUBLICATIONS 492 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE Roy Campbell University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign 616 PUBLICATIONS 15,726 CITATIONS SEE PROFILE All content following this page was uploaded by Roy Campbell on 03 September 2014. The user has requested enhancement of the downloaded file.
ILLINOIS JOURNAL OF UNDERGRADUATE RESEARCH, VOL. 2, SPRING 2007 A Hypervisor for Embedded Computing Philip Reames, Ellick Chan, Francis David, Jeffrey Carlyle and Roy Campbell Abstract - Mobile applications are a nascent market waiting to be tapped. Next generation mobiles offer a promise of specialized hardware such as multi-touch screens (like the Apple iPhone) or motion sensors (as with the Nintendo Wii) which will enable exciting new applications. In order to make optimal use of these hardware devices, applications must directly interact with the hardware. However, the ability to use native applications carries a certain risk for both device security and reliability. For example, a rogue application could compromise your address book or flood a mobile network. We propose to solve this problem by limiting the access of native applications through confinement in virtual machines that allow applications to access fully- featured hardware efficiently, while isolating dangerous functionality from other virtual machines. Following a brief discussion of relevant background material, we discuss and explore the use cases and issues that make embedded virtualization challenging. Then, we describe the initial exploration efforts and the goals that were established for the prototype. We then present the resulting architecture in detail. Finally, we conclude with a brief listing of future work planned and a summary of related work. I. BACKGROUND Virtualization is the concept of defining multiple virtual machines that operate on a single physical machine. It can be used to run several isolated instances of legacy operating systems, each in its own virtual machine, on a common set of hardware. [1] Each operating system – herein referred to as virtual machines or guests – functions independently of the others and is fully protected from any accidental or malicious actions by other guests. Unlike emulation or simulation, much of the guest’s machine code is run directly on the hardware without modification or interpretation. Depending on the objective of the particular system, the guests may be able to interact through channels with well-defined interfaces. The software system that provides this abstraction is called a Virtual Machine Monitor (VMM) or hypervisor.

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