Grammar Review.pdf - NOUN A word that names a person place...

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NOUN ADJECTIVE PRONOUN A word that names a person, place, thing, quality or act. A word used to describe a noun. A word used to replace a noun. Examples: Examples: Mother Apple Valley Happiness Fighter Animal Examples: Big Cold Blue Silly Wonderful Lovely I Me She Her He Him It You They Them ARTICLE VERB ADVERB A word that introduces a noun and also limits or clarifies it; Example: are a an the A word that describes an action or a state of being. An adverb describes a verb, adjective, or adverb. It often ends in "ly" and clarifies "how," "when," "where," or "how much". Example: Wiggle Walk Run Jump Think Fly Lived To Be Example: Easily Warmly Quickly Mainly Freely Often PREPOSITION CONJUNCTION INTERJECTION A word that describes the relationship between a noun and another noun (or verb or adverb). A word that joins other words, phrases, clauses or sentences. A word that expresses emotion. An interjection often starts a sentence but it can be within a sentence or stand alone. Example: And As Because But Or Since So Until While Example: To Under For At By From From Above Near At By After With Example: Oh Wow What Hurray Gosh
A complete sentence has three characteristics: First, it begins with a capital letter. In addition, it includes an end mark either a period [ . ], question mark [ ? ], or exclamation point [ ! ]. Most importantly, the complete sentence must contain at least one main clause. A main clause contains an independent subject and verb and expresses a complete thought. A main clause sometimes called an independent clause must contain a subject and a verb as well as express a complete thought. Look at the examples below: Example of Main Clause: Diane kicked the soda machine. Diane = the subject; kicked = the verb. Remember this important point: You must have at least one main clause in every sentence . A main clause is the essential component. Without a main clause, a group of words is a fragment , a major error in writing. A subordinate clause also called a dependent clause will begin with a subordinate conjunction or a relative pronoun and will contain both a subject and a verb . This combination of words will not form a complete sentence . It will instead make a reader want additional information to finish the thought. List of Subordinate Conjunctions List of Relative Pronouns After, although, as, because, before, even if, even though, if, in order that , once, provided that, rather than, since, so that, than, that, though, unless, until, when, whenever, where, whereas, wherever, whether, while, why That, which, whichever, who, whoever, whom, whose, whosever, whomever Examples of Subordinate Clauses: After Amy sneezed on the tuna salad After = subordinate conjunction; Amy = subject; sneezed = verb.

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