Environmental_Science_9e_Ch14 - CHAPTER 14 Nonrenewable...

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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 10 / Exercise 34
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
275 E nergy comes in many forms. In most industrial nations, coal, oil, and natural gas are the predominant fuels. These non- renewable forms of energy are the lifeblood of modern indus- trial societies, but they are also a potential Achilles’ heel. If you cut the supply off for even a brief moment, industry would come to a standstill. Agriculture and mining would halt. Millions would be out of work. Automobiles would vanish from city streets. Al- most everything in our homes would cease to operate. In addition, as the Gulf oil spill in 2010 showed, our dependence on these fuels can be extremely costly! Many of the less developed nations have pinned their hopes for economic progress on their ability to tap into oil, coal, natural gas, and to a lesser extent nuclear power, which have fueled the indus- Nonrenewable Energy Sources Energy Use: Our Growing Dependence on Nonrenewable Fuels What Is Energy? Fossil Fuels: Analyzing Our Options Fossil Fuels: Meeting Future Demand Nuclear Energy Guidelines for Creating a Sustainable Energy System Establishing Priorities Spotlight on Sustainable Development 14-1: Controversy Over Oil Exploration in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Spotlight on Sustainable Development 14-2: Coca-Cola Goes Green Point/Counterpoint: Should We Drill for Oil in the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge? Point/Counterpoint: Should Nuclear Power Be Revived? 14.7 14.6 14.5 14.4 14.3 14.2 14.1 CHAPTER OUTLINE CHAPTER 14 That human beings are fallible has been known since the beginning of time, but modern technology adds new urgency to the recognition. —Garrett Hardin
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An Introduction to Physical Science
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Chapter 10 / Exercise 34
An Introduction to Physical Science
Shipman/Wilson
Expert Verified
276 PART IV. Resource Issues: Solutions for a Sustainable Society FIGURE 14-1 Chang- ing options. Energy consumption in the United States by fuel type from 1850 to the present. As this graph shows, U.S. energy de- pendence has shifted over the years from wood to oil, coal, and natural gas. (Quad = quadrillion BTUs.) Source: US Statistical Abstract. CRITICAL THINKING Exercise Global climate change has led many propo- nents of nuclear energy in the United States to lobby the public and Congress for renewed support of nuclear energy to lessen America’s dependence on foreign oil and coal. Adver- tisements in prominent magazines still tout the benefits of nuclear power. In such ads, proponents of nuclear power note that this technology has the added benefit of not contributing to global warming, a problem worsened by the combustion of fossil fuels— especially coal, oil, and oil byproducts such as gasoline, jet fuel, and diesel. Is this thinking valid? Why or why not? oil, natural gas, and nuclear energy. It looks at their impacts and their abundance. It ends with some guidelines on creating a sustainable energy future. Energy Use: Our Growing Dependence on Nonrenewable Fuels U.S. and Canadian Energy Consumption One hundred years ago, Americans had few choices for en- ergy ( FIGURE 14-1 ). Wood, a renewable resource, was the main form of energy. Today, the nation’s options are many: coal, oil, natural gas, hydropower, geothermal energy, solar power, nuclear power, and wind.

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