lecture_09

lecture_09 - Introduction to Algorithms 6.046J/18.401J...

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Introduction to Algorithms 6.046J/18.401J Lecture 9 Prof. Piotr Indyk
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Today or how to avoid this Balanced search trees, even in the worst case 1 2 3 4 5 6 © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.2
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Balanced search trees Balanced search tree: A search-tree data structure for which a height of O (lg n ) is guaranteed when implementing a dynamic set of n items. AVL trees Examples: 2-3 trees 2-3-4 trees B-trees Red-black trees © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.3
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Red-black trees BSTs with an extra one-bit color field in each node. Red-black properties: 1. Every node is either red or black. 2. The root and leaves ( NIL ’s) are black. 3. If a node is red, then its parent is black. 4. All simple paths from any node x to a descendant leaf have the same number of black nodes. © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.4
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Example of a red-black tree 8 8 11 11 10 10 18 18 26 26 22 22 3 3 7 7 NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL NIL © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.5
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Use of red-black trees What properties would we like to prove about red-black trees ? – They always have O(log n) height –There is an O(log n) –time insertion procedure which preserves the red-black properties Is it true that, after we add a new element to a tree (as in the previous lecture), we can always recolor the tree to keep it red-black ? © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.6
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Example of a red-black tree 8 8 11 11 10 10 18 18 26 26 22 22 3 3 7 7 7.5 7.5 © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.7
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Use of red-black trees What properties would we like to prove about red- black trees ? –They always have O(log n) height – There is an O(log n) –time insertion procedure which preserves the red-black properties Is it true that, after we add a new element to a tree (as in the previous lecture), we can always recolor the tree to keep it red-black ? NO After insertions, sometimes we need to juggle nodes around © Piotr Indyk and Charles E. Leiserson Introduction to Algorithms October 13, 2004 L9.8
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Rotations A A B B α α β β γ γ R IGHT -R OTATE (B) B B A A γ γ β β α α L EFT -R OTATE (A) Rotations maintain the inorder ordering of keys: a ∈α , b ∈β , c ∈γ a A b B c .
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This note was uploaded on 04/10/2008 for the course CSE 6.046J/18. taught by Professor Piotrindykandcharlese.leiserson during the Fall '04 term at MIT.

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lecture_09 - Introduction to Algorithms 6.046J/18.401J...

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