file-disks midterm reading - 37 Hard Disk Drives The last chapter introduced the general concept of an I\/O device and showed you how the OS might

file-disks midterm reading - 37 Hard Disk Drives The last...

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37 Hard Disk Drives The last chapter introduced the general concept of an I/O device and showed you how the OS might interact with such a beast. In this chapter, we dive into more detail about one device in particular: the hard disk drive . These drives have been the main form of persistent data storage in computer systems for decades and much of the development of file sys- tem technology (coming soon) is predicated on their behavior. Thus, it is worth understanding the details of a disk’s operation before building the file system software that manages it. Many of these details are avail- able in excellent papers by Ruemmler and Wilkes [RW92] and Anderson, Dykes, and Riedel [ADR03]. C RUX : H OW T O S TORE A ND A CCESS D ATA O N D ISK How do modern hard-disk drives store data? What is the interface? How is the data actually laid out and accessed? How does disk schedul- ing improve performance? 37.1 The Interface Let’s start by understanding the interface to a modern disk drive. The basic interface for all modern drives is straightforward. The drive consists of a large number of sectors (512-byte blocks), each of which can be read or written. The sectors are numbered from 0 to n 1 on a disk with n sectors. Thus, we can view the disk as an array of sectors; 0 to n 1 is thus the address space of the drive. Multi-sector operations are possible; indeed, many file systems will read or write 4KB at a time (or more). However, when updating the disk, the only guarantee drive manufactures make is that a single 512- byte write is atomic (i.e., it will either complete in its entirety or it won’t complete at all); thus, if an untimely power loss occurs, only a portion of a larger write may complete (sometimes called a torn write ). 1
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2 H ARD D ISK D RIVES 0 11 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 Spindle Figure 37.1: A Disk With Just A Single Track There are some assumptions most clients of disk drives make, but that are not specified directly in the interface; Schlosser and Ganger have called this the “unwritten contract” of disk drives [SG04]. Specifically, one can usually assume that accessing two blocks that are near one-another within the drive’s address space will be faster than accessing two blocks that are far apart. One can also usually assume that accessing blocks in a contiguous chunk (i.e., a sequential read or write) is the fastest access mode, and usually much faster than any more random access pattern. 37.2 Basic Geometry Let’s start to understand some of the components of a modern disk. We start with a platter , a circular hard surface on which data is stored persistently by inducing magnetic changes to it. A disk may have one or more platters; each platter has 2 sides, each of which is called a sur- face . These platters are usually made of some hard material (such as aluminum), and then coated with a thin magnetic layer that enables the drive to persistently store bits even when the drive is powered off.
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  • Fall '14
  • Hard disk drive, disk drives, disk, Seek time

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