ch09 - 1234567898 9.1 a) Flowrate pneumatic transmitter: 15...

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Unformatted text preview: 1234567898 9.1 a) Flowrate pneumatic transmitter: 15 psig - 3 psig qm(psig)= (q gpm - 0 gpm) + 3 psig 400 gpm-0 gpm psig = 0.03 q (gpm) + 3 psig gpm Pressure current transmitter: 20 mA - 4 mA Pm(mA)= ( p in.Hg − 10 in.Hg) + 4 mA 30 in.Hg - 10 in.Hg mA = 0.8 p (in.Hg) − 4 mA in.Hg Level voltage transmitter: 5 VDC - 1 VDC hm(VDC)= (h(m) - 0.5m) + 1 VDC 20 m - 0.5 m VDC = 0.205 h(m) + 0.897 VDC m Concentration transmitter: 10 VDC - 1 VDC Cm(VDC)= (C (g/L)-2 g/L)+1 VDC 20 g/L - 2 g/L VDC = 0.5 C (g/L) g/L b) The gains, zeros and spans are: Solution Manual for Process Dynamics and Control, 2nd edition, Copyright © 2004 by Dale E. Seborg, Thomas F. Edgar and Duncan A. Mellichamp 9-1 GAIN ZERO SPAN PNEUMATIC 0.03psig/gpm 0gal/min 400gal/min VOLTAGE CURRENT VOLTAGE 0.8mA/in.Hg 0.205 VDC/m 0.5VDC/g/L 10 in.Hg 0.5m 2g/L 20 in.Hg 19.5m 18g/L *The gain is a constant quantity 9.2 a) The safest conditions are achieved by the lowest temperatures and pressures in the flash vessel. VALVE 1.- Fail close VALVE 2.- Fail open VALVE 3.- Fail open VALVE 4.- Fail open VALVE 5.- Fail close Setting valve 1 as fail close prevents more heat from going to flash drum and setting valve 3 as fail open to allow the steam chest to drain. Setting valve 3 as fail open prevents pressure build up in the vessel. Valve 4 should be fail-open to evacuate the system and help keep pressure low. Valve 5 should be fail-close to prevent any additional pressure build-up. b) Vapor flow to downstream equipment can cause a hazardous situation VALVE 1.- Fail close VALVE 2.- Fail open VALVE 3.- Fail close VALVE 4.- Fail open VALVE 5.- Fail close Setting valve 1 as fail close prevents more heat from entering flash drum and minimizes future vapor production. Setting valve 2 as fail open will allow the steam chest to be evacuated, setting valve 3 as fail close prevents vapor from escaping the vessel. Setting valve 4 as fail open allows liquid to leave, preventing vapor build up. Setting valve 4 as fail-close prevents pressure buildup. c) Liquid flow to downstream equipment can cause a hazardous situation VALVE 1.- Fail close VALVE 2.- Fail open VALVE 3.- Fail open VALVE 4.- Fail close VALVE 5.- Fail close 9-2 Set valve 1 as fail close to prevent all the liquid from being vaporized (This would cause the flash drum to overheat). Setting valve 2 as fail open will allow the steam chest to be evacuated. Setting valve 3 as fail open prevents pressure buildup in drum. Setting valve 4 as fail close prevents liquid from escaping. Setting valve 5 as fail close prevents liquid build-up in drum 9.3 a) Assume that the differential-pressure transmitter has the standard range of 3 psig to 15 psig for flow rates of 0 gpm to qm(gpm). Then, the pressure signal of the transmitter is 12 PT = 3 + 2 q 2 q m dP 24 KT = T = 2 q dq qm 2.4/qm , q = 10% of qm 12/qm , q = 50% of qm 18/qm , q = 75% of qm 21.6/qm , q = 90% of qm KT = b) Eq. 9-2 gives 1/ 2 ∆P q = Cv f (1) v gs = qm f ( 1 ) For a linear valve, f (1) = 1 = αP , where α is a constant. KV = dq = qm α dP Hence, linear valve gain is same for all flowrates 9-3 For a square-root valve, f ( 1 ) = 1 = αP q α 1 q αq dq 1 KV = = qm α = m = m m dP 2 1 2 q 2 p 5qmα , q = 10% of qm qmα , q = 50% of qm 0.67qmα , q = 75% of qm 0.56qmα , q = 90% of qm KV = For an equal-percentage valve, f (1) = R 1 −1 = R αP −1 KV = q dq = qm αR 1 −1 ln R = qm α ln R dP qm 0.1qmαlnR , q = 10% of qm 0.5qmαlnR , q = 50% of qm 0.75qmαlnR , q = 75% of qm 0.9qmαlnR , q = 90% of qm KV = c) The overall gain is KTV = KTKV Using results in parts a) and b) For a linear valve 2.4α , q = 10% of qm 12α , q = 50% of qm 18α , q = 75% of qm 21.6α , q = 90% of qm KTV = 9-4 For a square-root valve KTV = 12α for all values of q For an equal-percentage valve 0.24αlnR , q = 10% of qm 6.0αlnR , q = 50% of qm 13.5αlnR , q = 75% of qm 19.4αlnR , q = 90% of qm KTV = The combination with a square-root valve gives linear characteristics over the full range of flow rate. For R = 50 and α = 0.067 values, a graphical comparison is shown in Fig. S9.3 7 Linear valve Square valve % valve 6 5 K TV 4 3 2 1 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 q/qm Fig. S9.3.- Graphical comparison of the gains for the three valves d) In a real situation, the square-root valve combination will not give an exactly linear form of the overall characteristics, but it will still be the combination that gives the most linear characteristics. 9-5 9.4 Nominal pressure drop over the condenser is 30 psi ∆Pc = Kq2 30 = K (200)2 ∆Pc = , K= 3 psi 4000 gpm 2 3 q2 4000 Let ∆Pv be the pressure drop across the valve and ∆P v , ∆P c be the nominal values of ∆Pv , ∆Pc, respectively. Then, ( ) ( ) ∆Pv = ∆ P v + ∆ Pc −∆Pc = 30 + ∆ Pv − 3 q2 4000 (1) Using Eq. 9-2 ∆P q = C v f (1) v g s 1/ 2 (2) and q ∆ Pv Cv = f (l ) g s −1/ 2 200 ∆ P v = 0.5 1.11 −1/ 2 (3) Substituting for ∆Pv from(1) and Cv from(3) into (2) , ∆ Pv q = 400 1.11 a) −1/ 2 3 2 30 + ∆ P v − 4000 q f (1) 1.11 ∆ Pv = 5 Linear valve: f (1) = 1 , and Eq. 4 becomes q 35 − 0.00075q 2 l= 188.5 1.11 −1 / 2 9-6 −1/ 2 (4) Equal % valve: f (1) = R 1 −1 = 20 1 −1 assuming R=20 q 35 − 0.00075q 2 −1 / 2 ln 1.11 188.5 l = 1+ ln 20 250 200 q(gpm) 150 Linear valve Equal % valve 100 50 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 l (valve lift) Figure S9.4a. Control valve characteristics for ∆ P v = 5 b) ∆ P v = 30 Linear valve: f (1) = 1 , and Eq. 4 becomes q 60 − 0.00075q 2 l= 76.94 1.11 −1 / 2 Equal % valve: f (1) = 20 1 −1 ; Eq. 4 gives q 60 − 0.00075q 2 −1 / 2 ln 1.11 76.94 l = 1+ ln 20 9-7 300 Linear valve Equal % valve 250 q (gpm) 200 150 100 50 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 l (valve lift) Figure S9.4b. Control valve characteristics for ∆ P v = 30 c) ∆ P v = 90 Linear valve: f (1) = 1 , and Eq. 4 becomes q 120 − 0.00075q 2 l= 44.42 1.11 −1 / 2 Equal % valve: f (1) = 20 1 −1 ; Eq. 4 gives q 120 − 0.00075q 2 −1 / 2 ln 1.11 44.42 l = 1+ ln 20 9-8 300 250 Equal % valve 200 150 100 Linear valve Equal % valve 50 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 l (valve lift) Figure S9.4c. Control valve characteristics for ∆ P v = 90 Conclusions from the above plots: 1) Linearity of the valve For ∆ P v = 5, the linear valve is not linear and the equal % valve is linear over a narrow range. For ∆ P v = 30, the linear valve is linear for very low 1 and equal % valve is linear over a wider range of 1 . For ∆ P v = 90, the linear valve is linear for 1 <0.5 approx., equal % valve is linear for 1 >0.5 approx. 2) Ability to handle flowrates greater than nominal increases as ∆ P v increases, and is higher for the equal % valve compared to that for the linear valve for each ∆ P v . 3) The pumping costs are higher for larger ∆ P v . This offsets the advantage of large ∆ P v in part 1) and 2) 9-9 9.5 Let ∆Pv/∆Ps = 0.33 at the nominal q = 320 gpm ∆Ps = ∆PB + ∆Po = 40 + 1.953 × 10-4 q2 ∆Pv= PD - ∆Ps = (1 –2.44 × 10-6 q2)PDE – (40 + 1.953 × 10-4 q2) (1 - 2.44 × 10 -6 × 320 2 )PDE - (40 + 1.953 × 10 -4 × 320 2 ) = 0.33 (40 + 1.953 × 10 -4 × 320 2 ) PDE = 106.4 psi Let qdes = q = 320 gpm For rated Cv, valve is completely open at 110% qdes i.e., at 352 gpm or the upper limit of 350 gpm ∆p C v = q v q s − 1 2 (1 − 2.44 × 10 × 350 )106.4 − (40 + 1.953 × 10 × 350 ) = 350 0.9 −6 2 Then using Eq. 9-11 q 66.4 − 4.55 × 10 − 4 q 2 −1 / 2 ln 0.9 101.6 l = 1+ ln 50 9-10 −4 2 − 1 2 400 350 300 q (gpm) 250 200 150 Cv = 101.6 Cv = 133.5 100 50 0 0 0.1 0.2 0.3 0.4 0.5 0.6 0.7 0.8 0.9 1 l (valve lift) Figure S9.5. Control valve characteristics From the plot of valve characteristic for the rated Cv of 101.6, it is evident that the characteristic is reasonably linear in the operating region 250 ≤ q ≤ 350. The pumping cost could be further reduced by lowering the PDE to a value that would make ∆Pv/∆Ps = 0.25 at q = 320 gpm. Then PDE = 100.0 and for qdes = 320 gpm, the rated Cv = 133.5. However, as the plot shows, the valve characteristic for this design is more nonlinear in the operating region. Hence the selected valve is Cv = 101.6 9-11 9.6 a) 1 0.9 0.8 0.7 f 0.6 0.5 0.4 0.3 Linear 0.2 "Square root" 0.1 "Square" 0 0 0.2 0.4 0.6 0.8 1 l The "square" valve appears similar to the equal percentage valve in Fig. 9.8 b) / d1 ) 1 =0 1 =0.5 1 =1 1/ 2 1 ∞ 0.707 0.5 1 1 1 1 21 0 1 2 Gain ( df Valve Quick open Linear Slow open The largest gain for quick opening is at 1 =0 (gain = ∞), while largest for slow opening is at 1 =1 (gain = 2). A linear valve has constant gain. c) q = C v f (1) For ∆Pv gs gs = 1 , ∆Pv = 64 , q = 1024 Cv is found when f (1) =1 (maximum flow): 9-12 Cv = d) ∆Pv g s = 1024 gal/min 1024 gal.in = =128 8 min.(lb)1/2 64 lb/in 2 1 in terms of applied pressure 1 =0 1 =1 when p = 3 psig when p = 15 psig Then 1 = e) q (1 − 0) 1 ( p − 3) = p − 0.25 (15 − 3) 12 q = 128 1 2 ∆Pv for slow opening ("square") valve 2 1 = 128 ∆Pv p − 0.25 12 128 2 = ∆Pv ( p − 3) = 0.8889 ∆Pv ( p − 3) 2 144 p=3 , q = 0 for all ∆Pv p =15 , q = 128 ∆Pv = 0 for ∆Pv = 0 = 1024 for ∆Pv = 64 looks O.K 9.7 Because the system dynamic behavior would be described using deviation variables, all that is important are the terms involving x, dx/dt and d2x/dt2. Using the values for M, K and R and solving the homogeneous o.d.e: 0.3 d 2x dx + 15,000 + 3600 x = 0 2 dt dt This yields a strongly overdamped solution, with ζ=228, which can be approximated by a first order model by ignoring the d2x/dt2 ter 9-13 9.8 A control system can incorporate valve sequencing for wide range along with compensation for the nonlinear curve (Shinskey, 1996). It features a small equal-percentage valve driven by a proportional pH controller. The output of the pH controller also operates a large linear valve through a proportional-plus-reset controller with a dead zone. The system is shown in Fig. E9.8 Reagent Linear pHC Percent Influent Figure S9.8. Schematic diagram for pH control Equal-percentage valves have an exponential characteristic, similar to the pH curve. As pH deviates from neutrality, the gain of the curve decreases; but increasing deviation will open the valve farther, increasing its gain in a compensating manner. As the output of the proportional controller drives the small valve to either of its limits, the dead zone of the two-mode controller is exceeded. The large valve is moved at a rate determined by the departure of the control signal from the dead zone and by the values of proportional and reset. When the control signal reenters the dead zone, the large valve is held in its last position. The large valve is of linear characteristic, because the process gain does not vary with flow, as some gains do. 9-14 Note: in the book’s second printing, the transient response in this problem will be modified by adding 5 minutes to the time at which each temperature reading was taken. We wish to find the model: ′ Tm ( s ) Km = T ′( s ) τm s + 1 where Tm is the measurement T is liquid temperature From Eq. 9-1, Km = range of instrument output 20 mA - 4 mA 16 mA mA = = =0.04 o o o o range of instrument input 400 C - 0 C 400 C C From Fig. 5.5, τ can be found by plotting the thermometer reading vs. time and the transmitter reading vs. time and drawing a horizontal line between the two ramps to find the time constant. This is shown in Fig. S9.9. Hence, ∆τ = 1.33 min = 80 sec To get τ, add the time constant of the thermometer (20 sec) to ∆τ to get τ = 100 sec. 122 120 118 T (deg F) 9.9 <Time constant> 116 114 112 110 Thermometer Transmitter 108 106 2 2.5 3 3.5 time (min) 4 4.5 5 Figure S9.9. Data test from the Thermometer and the Transmitter 9-15 9.10 precision = 0.1 psig = 0.5% of full scale 20 psig accuracy is unknown since the "true" pressure in the tank is unknown resolution = 0.1 psig = 0.5% of full scale 20 psig repeatability = ±0.1 psig =±0.5% of full scale 20 psig 9.11 Assume that the gain of the sensor/transmitter is unity. Then, ′ Tm ( s ) 1 = T ′( s ) ( s + 1)(0.1s + 1) where T is the quantity being measured Tm is the measured value T ′ (t) = 0.1 t °C/s , T ′ (s) = ′ Tm ( s ) = 0 .1 s2 1 0.1 × 2 ( s + 1)(0.1s + 1) s ′ Tm (t ) = −0.0011e −10t + 0.111e − t + 0.1t − 0.11 Maximum error occurs as t→∞ and equals |0.1t − (0.1t − 0.11)| = 0.11 °C If the smaller time constant is neglected, the time domain response is a bit different for small values of time, although the maximum error (t→∞) doesn't change. 9-16 2 1.8 1.6 1.4 T', Tm' (C) 1.2 1 0.8 0.6 Tm'(t) T'(t) 0.4 0.2 0 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 16 18 20 t(s) Figure S9.11. Response for process temperature sensor/transmitter 9-17 ...
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