The Effect of Pre-Literacy and Family Participation .docx -...

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Krizia Columna Susan Sgroi ENG101 (134) 19 th of July 2020 The Effect of Pre-Literacy and Family Participation Presently, one of the major concerns of Global education is to improve literacy skills in all students. In the United States, an estimated 30 million people over the age of 16 read no better than the average elementary school child. Yet the ability to read and write is the basis for all other education; literacy is necessary for an individual to understand information that is out of context, whether written or verbal. Success in literacy learning for all children continues to be an important national goal and priority (Learning First Alliance 1998; Snow, Burns, Griffin 1998). Many studies have shown the positive influence that pre-literacy skills have in students’ overall academic achievement. The results from over thirty years of research suggest that students of all ages and economic backgrounds are likely to benefit from parental involvement in their development of pre-literacy skills and schooling (Henderson and Berla 1996; Lee 1994). Furthermore, studies have also shown the importance of pre-literacy skills on the transition from elementary school, to middle school to high school and school completion with a child’s educational expectations. Research has found that children who are reading below grade level in third grade rarely “catch up” in later grades. In fact, first grade reading skills have been shown to be a strong predictor of 11th grade reading levels. Improving pre-literacy skills especially in first grade can increase the academic achievement of students and parents are an important component to achieve this goal.
Consequently, government at local, state, and national levels have made many attempts to mandate pre-literacy skill programs in schools. After his inauguration in 2001, President Bush sent Congress an educational proposal called “Reading First”. The proposal was incorporated into Title I of the Elementary and Secondary Act (ESEA), which Bush renamed No Child Left Behind. He said it would fulfill his campaign promise of “ensuring that every child can read by the third grade.” Pre-literacy skills are fundamental for learning in school. It has an impact on an individual's ability to participate in society and to understand important public issues. And it provides the foundation upon which these skills are used throughout a student’s life span. A key indicator of educational progress is the extent to which schools are successful in equipping their students with strong literacy skills. Society needs exceptional individuals that can lead out way into the future. Schools and families are two of the most important venues to best accomplish this task. Schools have to provide the best education and the resources to help students to be successful in education (Epstein 1994). Families have to provide the support, control, and the proper learning environment to facilitate this process. Parental involvement has been a fundamental part in the effort to instigate pre-literacy skills in students for many decades.

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