A Jewish Response to Kant

A Jewish Response to Kant - Elizabeth R. Katzki Jewish...

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Elizabeth R. Katzki Jewish Response to Kant’s View of Revealed Morality Kant describes revealed morality as a set of moral laws, externally imposed upon a people: “The startling claim of the revealed morality of Judaism is, however, that G-d himself enters into the relationship. He confronts man with the demand to turn to his human neighbor, and in doing so, turn back to G-d Himself.” (Kant) Kant’s challenge is that he thinks that morality, true morality, is something that needs to come from within and spring from human nature, not from an external source, as he sees Judaism’s Covenant with G-d to come from. Jewish people choose to be Jewish; starting with Abraham, and continuing now, therefore, revealed morality is accepted by each individual Jew; from within. Though G-d’s laws are written by G-d, the Jews accept them, and are, therefore, Jewish. This “general acceptance of the law itself” (Covenant) occurs in many places, but occurs most voluntarily at the end of the book of Esther. Every person, however, renews this
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A Jewish Response to Kant - Elizabeth R. Katzki Jewish...

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