DIDLS - AP Language Composition Rhetorical Analysis DIDLS The Key to TONE Diction the word choice What words does the author choose Consider his\/her

DIDLS - AP Language Composition Rhetorical Analysis DIDLS...

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AP Language & Composition: Rhetorical Analysis DIDLS: The Key to TONE D iction - the word choice What words does the author choose? Consider his/her word choice compared to another. Why did the author choose that particular word? What are the advantages and disadvantages? Ex: Self-confident: proud, conceited, egotistical, stuck-up, haughty, smug, condescending Describe diction by considering the following: a) syllables – words can be monosyllabic or polysyllabic . The higher the ration of polysyllabic words, the more difficult the content. b) denotative/connotative meanings c) concrete ( specific) or abstract (general) d) sounds – words can be pleasant sounding ( euphonious ) or harsh sounding ( cacophonous ) I mages - vivid appeals to understanding through the senses What images does the author use? What does he/she focus on in a sensory way? NOTE: Images differ from detail in the degree to which they appeal to the senses. The use of vivid descriptions or figures of speech that appeal to sensory experiences helps to create the author's tone. 1) Reference to one thing as another a. simile b. metaphor c. personification d. synecdoche - a whole is represented by a part EX: All hands on deck! e. metonymy – reference to something/someone through an associated item EX: The suits on Wall Street surely made a mess of things! 2) Wordplay/Pun a. onomatopoeia b. paronomasia – punning c. antanaclasis - the repetition of a word or phrase whose meaning changes in the second instance EX: “Your argument is sound...all sound. “ (Benjamin Franklin) 3) Substitutions a. anthimeria – substitution of one part of speech for another
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EX: Go ahead and google that to find an answer.
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  • Fall '14
  • Berry
  • Dependent clause, sentence length, a. Simple sentence, subordinate clauses

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