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MAIMOUNA_DIARRA_-_Dust_Bowl_Migrants - Dust Bowl Migrants...

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Dust BowlMigrantsUsing EvidenceObjectiveWhat were the effects of the Dust Bowl ? How did the Dust Bowlimpact and shape migration patterns? Whowere the Dust Bowlmigrants?Contextualization - Part 1:Read the historical context provided below and closely review the map.When you are done, answerthe contextualization questions on the next page.The Dust Bowlbegan as a drought, or severe lack of rain water. When the droughtstruck in 1930, temperatures soared. For example, in 1930 it was 108 degrees inKansas for weeks on end. As the drought waged on, high winds would blow the toplayer of soil away, eroding the land and making it impossible to farm. One Kansascounty, which produced 3.4 million bushels of wheat in 1931, harvested just 89,000bushels in 1933.Regular rainfall would not return to the region until 1939.The Dust Bowlresulted in hundreds of families migrating to the southwest andWest Coast. Although the Dust Bowlincluded many Great Plains states, themigrants were generically known as "Okies," referring to the approximately 20percent who were from Oklahoma. The migrants came primarily from Oklahoma,Texas, Arkansas, and Missouri. Most migrants ended up in California.California was not the promised land of the migrants' dreams. Although the weatherwas comparatively better and farmers' fields were bountiful with produce,Californians also felt the effects of the Depression. Local and state infrastructureswere already overburdened, and the steady stream of newly arriving migrants wasmore than the system could bear. Additionally, arrival in California did not put anend to the migrants' travels. Their lives were characterized by migration. In anattempt to maintain a steady income, workers had to follow the harvest around thestate. When potatoes were ready to be picked, the migrants needed to be where thepotatoes were. The same principle applied to harvesting cotton, lemons, oranges,peas, and other crops.Source for map:National Resources Conservation Service| Source for text:Digital History,
Library of CongressContextualization - Part 1 - Analysis Questions:1)How did the weather phenomenon during the Dust Bowlimpact farming?
2)When did the Dust Bowltake place in relation to the Great Depression?
3)Who were the “okies”? Do you think that nickname was a positive or negative name? Why or why not?
4)Where did most Dust Bowlmigrants end up?
5)According to the map, which many states were impacted by the Dust Bowl ?
Contextualization - part 2:Review the following images of Dust Bowlmigrants.Read the captions and answer the analysis questions thatfollow on the back.

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