Age of Jackson Ids - Chapter 9 Ids AP US I Age of Jackson Andrew Jackson was inaugurated o n March 4 1829 The Age of Jackson marked a transformation of

Age of Jackson Ids - Chapter 9 Ids AP US I Age of Jackson...

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Chapter 9 Ids. AP US I Age of Jackson Andrew Jackson was inaugurated o n March 4, 1829. The Age of Jackson marked a transformation of American politics that extended the right to vote to many new groups. Before 1820 mainly white males who were property owners or taxpayers were the only ones that were able to vote. Not long before Jackson's election, things changed and most adult white males where able to vote and all voters were able to hold public office. Change led to resistance and at the Massachusetts Constitutional convention, they revised the Constitution to say that voters must be taxpayers and the governor had to own considerable real estate. The property qualification in the natural rights was abolished. There was reform in Rhode Island but in the South voting rights were mainly for planters and politicians. The number of voters started to increase rapidly. People started to accept that political parties were not evil and in the 1830s a fully formed two-party system began to operate nationally. Those against Jackson called themselves the Whigs and his followers called themselves the Democrats instead of the former Democratic Republicans. Jackson believed that democracy should offer "equal protection and equal benefits" to all its white male citizens and favor no region or class over another. The Spoils System The Spoils System helped the Jackson administration to "make the right of elected officials to appoint their own followers to public office an established feature of American politics." During his eight years in office Jackson only removed less than one- fifth of the federal officeholders. The Spoils System helped limit the power of permanent officeholders and the exclusive party caucus although it didn't really transfer power to the
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Chapter 9 Ids. AP US I people. Although it was expanding, political opportunity wasn't expanding as much as Jacksonian rhetoric suggested because delegates to national conventions were usually members of local party organizations. John C. Calhoun John C. Calhoun was Jackson's vice president and was forty-six years old in 1828. During this time, many people from his home state, South Carolina, were starting to believe that the "tariff of abominations" was responsible for the stagnation of their state's economy. The stagnation was really a result of the exhaustion of their farmland, which could not compete with the newly opened farmland in the Southwest. They were starting to consider secession. Calhoun came up with the theory of nullification as an alternative and it gained broad support in South Carolina. It didn't have the effect that he had hoped for which was to help his standing within the new administration because Martin Van Buren was a rival of his. Martin Van Buren Van Buren was about the same age as Calhoun. In 1828 he had won election to the governorship of New York but later resigned in 1829 when Jackson appointed him secretary of state. He established himself as a member of the official cabinet as well as in the "Kitchen Cabinet" which was the president's unofficial circle of political allies. His
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