22.Microbe.Biorem.15 - Microbial Bioremediation...

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Microbial Bioremediation Introduction Types of Respiration Processes Some Types of Biodegradation Reactions Bioremediation Strategies Summary and Conclusions
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I. Introduction Most microbes live in soils and sediments There is literally over a million species To date less than 5% have been characterized They use soil organic matter as their carbon source
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II. Types of Respiration Processes Processes depend on the terminal e- acceptors for respiration Communities include those in the photic, oxic and anoxic zones Redox potential determines viability of any e- acceptor
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Types of Microbes in the Environment Aerobic (a) – use O 2 for respiration Anaerobic (b) – use other e- acceptors Facultative (c) – can grow either way (“switch hitters”) Microaerobic (d) – need only a small amount of O 2 Aerotolerant (e) – anaerobic but can tolerate O 2
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Temperature and pH Influences Microbes generally have a temperature optimum at which metabolic rate is maximal (15-45 o C) While they best function at pH 5.5 – 8.5, some can tolerate extreme acidic (acidophiles) or basic (alkaliphiles) conditions Soils can serve to buffer temperature,
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Optimal Growth Conditions Lag phase (1) – microbes adjusting to new substrate (C source) Exponential growth phase (2) – microbes have acclimated to new conditions Stationary phase (3) – limited substrate or e- acceptor limits growth rate Decay phase (4) – substrate supply is exhausted
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III. Some Types of Biodegradation Reactions
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