Roman Fever- Betrayal - 1 Roman Fever Betrayal Edith...

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1 Roman Fever: Betrayal Edith Wharton was a very prominent writer in the twentieth century and is considered to be a major contributor to the practice of psychological realism in literature. Wharton was born in New York City on January 24, 1862 into a patriarchal, cultured, educated, wealthy, but very strict family. Because of the drastic social, cultural, and economic changes brought on by post- Civil War expansion and immigration, Wharton wrote much about the psychic and moral aspects of people, the old aristocracy of New York in conflict with the nouveau riches, and the futile struggle of characters faced with social forces. It was not until her late thirties that she accepted authorship as a career, mostly because of her increasing marital discontent and that she had no children. In her lifetime, she published some fifty varied volumes, won the Pulitzer Prize, received the Chevalier of Legion of Honor, and was awarded the gold medal of the National Institute of Arts and Letters. Her ability to analyze human behavior and motivation and society’s struggle for power and survival shows that she is one the great woman writers in American Literature. In “Roman Fever,” the story opens with two middle-aged American ladies enjoying the view of Rome from the terrace of a restaurant. Mrs. Slade and Mrs. Ansley have been lifelong friends, thrown into intimacy by circumstance rather than by a true liking for each other. They first met as young ladies vacationing in Rome with their families, and they have lived for most of their adult lives across the street from each other in New York. Now, they find themselves again in each other's company. Both are spending the spring in Rome, accompanied by their daughters, Jenny Slade and Barbara Ansley. The two women compare their daughters and each other's lives, trying to make
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  • Summer '08
  • ABBOUD
  • Literature, Mrs. Ansley, Mrs. Slade, Jenny Slade

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