Part1 - NEW AMERICANISTS A SERIES EDITED BY DONALD E PEASE...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
NEW AMERICANISTS * A SERIES EDITED BY DONALD E. PEASE FROM WALDEN POND TO JURASSIC PARK ACTIVISM, CULTURE. STUDIES * PAUL~AUTER DU ICE UN IVE KSITY PRESS DURHAM AND LONDON 2001
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
I have chosen this vaJ as it is now being pract discipline. American st1 concerned with culture.' plinary strategy.But it ha popular culture3 and vis politics. In looking at a r period, my own junior I its autobiographical imr how varied cultural forr particular moment to sh. that most total ofhumal I Fiftyyearsago, when We sion, I was a twelve-yeaI School in the Bronx. W; school with excellent fae City schools into three tj. went to elementary or ~ they continued-to high elementary school for si~ then go on to high schc) ment, so far as I have I their most unmanageab through fourteen-from the one hand, and from cents in high school, on and sexual developmen 1 ceptable fonns of behav cialized into young ad1. mature adults did not tho all, Jews,who constitut€' brate the coming-of-age in the 1940Sand 1950S~ the bar mitzvah boy, wa~ Located in the midst pnmaMJW~A.~nQ~'{' This essay addresses some of the ways in which wartime culture was con- structed and sustained in the United States in the mid-1940S. The com- plex way of perceiving, experiencing, and understanding the world, and act- i~g in it, which we call "culture," has many sources. These include fonnal education, popular songs as well as more literary texts, movies and other media, reference and peer , group as well as parental pressures, and the fonnative power of such factors as race, gender, class, and sexuality. Studying culture therefore requires an eclectic methodology, which borrows from literary crit- icism, art history, psychology,anthropology, among other disciplines, and even from autobiography-since cultural meanings emerge in the particular yet diverse waysindividuals perceive and act. Consequently, in what follows .1have used a variety of analytic strategies, some of which may at first seem unusual in a scholarly paper. Butthey are cal- culated to bring to the reader as "thick"! an account ofwartime Ameri- can culture and its construction-at least in one significant place-as I CHAPTER FOUR CULTURE AND CONFORMITY IN WARTIME AMERICA: MY JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL SONGBOOK
Background image of page 2
Iresses some of the ways 'time culture was con- ;ustained in the United mid-1940s. The com. ~rceiving, experiencing, Iding the world, and act- h we call "culture," has n, popular songs as well dia, reference and peer ormative power of such ldying culture therefore 'rows from literary crit- mong other disciplines, meanings emerge in the e and act. Consequently, .ytic strategies. some of I paper.Buttheyarecal. ount ofwartime Ameri. Iesignificant place-as I -'~f .1 -- - I have chosen this varied approach also because American studies as it is now being practiced in the United States is itself an eclectic discipline. American studies was always in some significant degree concerned with culture,2 and it has also prided itself on its interdisci-
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course COMP 105 taught by Professor Bidell during the Winter '07 term at University of Michigan.

Page1 / 10

Part1 - NEW AMERICANISTS A SERIES EDITED BY DONALD E PEASE...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online