Module 7 Homework Assignment - World Civilization 1 World...

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 8 pages.

World Civilization 1 World Civilization I Module 7 Homework Assignment for HIS 125: World Civilization I Scott Conklin Allied American University This paper was prepared for HIS 125: World Civilization I, Module 7 Homework Assignment taught by Matthew Avitabile
PART I 1. What made possible the expansion of the Chinese economy, and what were the outcomes of this economic growth? a. Chinese historians traditionally viewed dynasties as following a standard cyclical pattern. Founders were vigorous men able to recruit capable followers to serve as officials and generals. Externally they would extend China’s borders; internally they would bring peace. They would collect low but fairly assessed taxes. Over time, however, emperors born in the palace would get used to luxury and lack the founders’ strength and wisdom. Families with wealth or political power would find ways to avoid taxes, forcing the government to impose heavier taxes on the poor. As a result, impoverished peasants would flee and the morale of those in the government and armies would decline. The dynasty would find itself able neither to maintain internal peace nor to defend its borders. Viewed in terms of this theory of the dynastic cycle, by 800 the Tang Dynasty was in decline. It had ruled China for nearly two centuries, and its high point was in the past. A massive rebellion had wracked it in the mid- eighth century, and the Uighur Turks and Tibetans were menacing its borders. Many of the centralizing features of the government had been abandoned, with power falling more and more to regional military governors. 2. How did the civil service examinations and the scholar-official class shape Chinese society and culture, and what impact did the Mongol conquest have on them? a. In the Song period the booming economy and the invention of printing allowed a great expansion in the size of the scholar- official class, which came to dominate
World Civilization 3 the government. The life of the educated class was strongly shaped by the civil service examinations, which most educated men spent a decade or more studying for, often unsuccessfully. Their high levels of education fostered interest in literature, antiquities, philosophy, and art. Because there were more educated men, more books were written, and because of the spread of printing, a much greater share of them have survived to the present, making it possible to see - dimensions of life poorly documented for earlier periods, such as the lives of women. China’s great wealth and its elite’s high levels of education could not be -

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture