SRC01_GONZALES&PRADO_ASTRONOMICAL INSTRUMENTS.pdf - Ancient...

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Unformatted text preview: Ancient & Modern Devices Harriane Mae Gonzales & Gestene Reanne Prado ABM 11 - SRC01 Ancient Devices 1. Nebra Sky Disk The Nebra Sky Disk is an ancient astronomical instrument made out of bronze disk with a blue-green platina and gold symbols. Built in 1600 BC, the disk was used to calculate the yearly course of the sun. 2. Armillary Sphere Invented by John Samuel Slater, armillary sphere is an early astronomical device for representing the great circles of the heavens, including in the most elaborate instruments the horizon, meridian, equator, tropics, polar circles, and an ecliptic hoop. 3. Celatone To use Jupiter's moons as a clock for determining longitude at sea, observing them through a telescope on the deck of a continuously moving ship, Galileo designed a device that he called celatone. It consisted of a metal helmet with a visor carrying a small telescope. 4. The Astrolabe The astrolabe is a calculation and pedagogical tool of Greek origin (2nd century BC). It made it possible to solve astronomic problems without any calculations. It identified, for example, the time that the the sun or the stars would rise or set, and the sun's height at its highest point above the horizon, etc. 5. Planisphere A planisphere is a simple hand-held device which shows a map of which stars are visible in the night sky at any particular time. By rotating a wheel, it shows how stars move across the sky through the night, and how different constellations are visible at different times of year. Modern Devices 1. Star Charts Similar to the ancient astronomical instrument (Nebra Sky Disk) which calculates the yearly course of the sun, modernity has the star chart which serves as a guide in the sky for astronomers and mere astronomy buffs. It is likely to take the form of a circular area peppered with dots representing stars arranged as they appear in the sky. The center of the chart shows stars that are directly overhead. 2. The Globe As an early astronomical device, armillary sphere represents the great circles of the heavens, including in the most elaborate instruments the horizon, meridian, equator, tropics, polar circles, and an ecliptic hoop, the globe also shares the same functions. The only difference is that it is now not only with circles but also continents, for astronomers to easily elaborate and explain the said lines. 3. Optical Telescope As Galileo designed a device that he called celatone, the optical telescope is a long, tube-shaped telescope that you might imagine he will also be using in modernity. It became the instrument of choice for observing distant stars. It gathers and focuses light, mainly from the visible part of the electromagnetic spectrum, to create a magnified image for direct view, 4. Quadrants The mariner's astrolabe remained the most popular astronomical instrument until the end of the seventeenth century. It became replaced by more accurate instruments such as quadrant. The four quadrants are a narrative of the journey of the Zodiac. 5. Space Telescope Telescopes launched into space represent the next phase of studying stars. Space telescopes orbit the Earth but are programmed to study stars in various ways. Infrared radiation, microwave, and gamma-ray detection must be performed away from the atmosphere, so telescopes such as the Hubble Space Telescope have very high resolution. This allows astronomers to follow the progression of exploding stars. Ancient & Modern Devices Comparison & Contrast Modern devices are devices that were once ancient discoveries but were enhanced. Modern devices have given more accurate and acceptable information for astronomers than ancient devices have. As of today, technologically advanced astronomical devices allow us to see stars, planets, and other bodies, giving us accurate depictions of space and letting us find out more of how planets were made, work or even contain. Modern devices have given astronomers accurate measurements of the length of the year as well as the correct explanation of eclipses. ...
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