Using conservation of energy to predict the qualitative exchange of kinetic and potential energy

Using conservation of energy to predict the qualitative exchange of kinetic and potential energy

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Using conservation of energy to predict the qualitative exchange of kinetic and potential energy A bicyclist is stopped at the entrance to a valley, as sketched below: You can solve this problem by using some facts about energy . First, use the fact that kinetic energy is energy in the form of motion, and that kinetic energy is proportional to the mass of what's moving and the square of the speed of the motion.
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That means the bicyclist has kinetic energy whenever he's moving, and that the faster he moves the more kinetic energy he has. Next, use the fact that potential energy is energy from the potential action of a force , and that potential energy is proportional to the strength of the force and to the distance over which it can act. In this case, the force is the force of gravity pulling the bicyclist down, and the distance over which it can act is his height above the bottom of the valley. (Once he reaches the bottom of the valley, gravity can't pull him any further down.) That
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Using conservation of energy to predict the qualitative exchange of kinetic and potential energy

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