Weekly Assignment 13 - were crushed to death. They began to...

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Brittney Harris History 111 Professor Connell 26 April 2007 Chronicle of the Grand Pacification Mania struck once the emperor and many of his followers were taken. There was a large mission that was enacted to retrieve him where many had died. Why didn’t they take a tranquil approach earlier as stated? Why were they so confident they were to accomplish their mission easily? Masashige and his followers took many approaches to help save the king Masashige had a crew that completely outnumbered the enemy but they still had a difficult time approaching the king. All but one of these approaches led to a large amount of deaths. Masashige and his followers continued to attack in an abrupt form; the first day they naïvely attacked the castle by advancing each side and the castle easily defeated them by opening there doors and using their archers. The second day they had the same tactic but got to the walls where they found that it is a double wall and many of their men
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Unformatted text preview: were crushed to death. They began to gain knowledge that they needed protection against the archers so they made shields and began their journey to the castle. When they arrived they were able to climb the walls but many who attempted were burned by boiling water by the enemy. Masashige finally led his troops to believe that staying back is the best approach. They learned that the castle was running out of food and no soldier wanted to come to replenish it. He devised a plan where he would burn his castle to make it look like he died and the enemy would be able to leave the castle. Once the group learned that patience was their key to victory they were able to save many lives by not fighting. Every time Masashige would lead his men into battle the castle seemed as if they already knew what they intended to do. Masashige grew aware of the castles approach, he devised a plan that would lead to their ultimate victory....
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This note was uploaded on 04/12/2008 for the course HIST 111 taught by Professor Connell during the Spring '07 term at Christopher Newport University.

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Weekly Assignment 13 - were crushed to death. They began to...

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