Jentz 11e-IM-FU05 - UnitFive Title BusLawSeal.eps Creator...

  • DeAnza College
  • BUS BUS18
  • Test Prep
  • iTaipeh
  • 6
  • 100% (1) 1 out of 1 people found this document helpful

This preview shows page 1 - 4 out of 6 pages.

Unit FiveFocus on Ethics:Negotiable InstrumentsSee Separate Lecture Outline SystemINTRODUCTIONArticles 3 and 4 of the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) reflect two fundamental ethical principles:  (1)that individuals should be protected against harm caused by the misuse of negotiable instruments and (2) thatthe   free   flow   of  commerce   should   be   encouraged   by   practical   and   reasonable   laws   governing   the   use   ofnegotiable instruments.  This focus examines some ethical dimensions of transactions that involve these instru-ments.FOCUS OUTLINEI.Ethics and the HDC ConceptBefore Article 3, at common law, courts often restricted the extent to which defenses such as fraud couldsuccessfully be raised against a good faith holder of a negotiable instrument.A.CASE BACKGROUND35
36          INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY BUSINESS LAW, ELEVENTH EDITIONThe text illustrates the point with an 1884 Kansas case in which a farmer who signed a note inreliance on another’s false representations could not later avoid payment on the note to a thirdparty who took the note without notice of the fraud.B.THE COURTS DECISIONThe court’s decision presaged the UCC’s position on the question. UCC 3-305(a)(1)(iii) states thatfraud is only a defense against an HDC if the injured party signed the instrument “with neitherknowledge nor a reasonable opportunity to obtain knowledge of its character or essential terms.”
UNIT FIVE:  FOCUS ON ETHICS—NEGOTIABLE INSTRUMENTS          37C.THE REASONING UNDERLYING THE HDC CONCEPTThe HDC doctrine reflects the philosophy that when two or more innocent parties are at risk, theburden should fall on the party that was in the best position to prevent the loss.II.Good Faith in Negotiable Instruments LawThe text discusses good faith in the context of the HDC doctrine.A.THE IMPORTANCE OF GOOD FAITHA 1998 Pennsylvania case, in which the court refused to apply the fictitious payee rule because abank did not act in good faith is offered as an example of good faith in this context.B.HOW SHOULD GOOD FAITH BE TESTED?The text sketches two answers to the question of how good faith should be measured—subjectivelyor objectively—and how those answers might affect HDC status diffferently.III.Efficiency v. Due CareThe text highlights the problem of signature verification on the billions of checks processed everymonth.  Does a bank exercise ordinary care if it follows the prevailing industry practice of examining signatureson only a few, randomly selected checks over a certain amount?

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture