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Chapter 4 Constitutional Authority to Regulate Business    See Separate Lecture Outline System I NTRODUCTION Many people assume that a government acts from a vague position of strength and can enact any reg u- lation it deems necessary or desirable.  This chapter emphasizes a different perspective from which to view the law: action taken by the government must come from authority and this authority cannot be exceeded. Neither Congress nor any state may pass a law in conflict with the Constitution.  The Constitution is the supreme law in this country.  The Constitution is the source of federal power and to sustain the legality of a federal law or action a specific federal power must be found in the Constitution.  States have inherent sovereign power—that is, the power to enact legislation that has a reasonable relationship to the welfare of the citizens of that state.  The states  delegated  the power of the federal government to it while the states  retained  their power, when the Constitution was ratified. The Constitution does not expressly give the states the power to regulate, but limits the states’ exercise of powers not delegated to the federal government. A DDITIONAL  R ESOURCES 57
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58           INSTRUCTOR’S MANUAL TO ACCOMPANY  BUSINESS LAW,  ELEVENTH EDITION A UDIO  & V IDEO  S UPPLEMENTS The following  audio and video supplements  are related to topics discussed in this chapter — PowerPoint Slides To highlight some of this chapter’s key points, you might use the Lecture Review PowerPoint slides compiled for Chapter 4. Drama of the Law II Free Speech: Constitutional Issues Electronic Surveillance of Employees Drug Testing of Employees Other Videos After you have concluded your discussion of constitutional law, you may want your students to view the following video: A Supreme Court Case C HAPTER  O UTLINE I. The Constitutional Powers of Government Before 1789, the Articles of Confederation defined the central federal government, which was perceived as too weak when state laws interfered with commerce. A national convention was called to amend the Articles, but instead the delegates drafted the U.S. Constitution. A. A F EDERAL  F ORM   OF  G OVERNMENT The U.S. Constitution established a federal form of government, through which the states and the national government share sovereign powers. B. T HE  R EGULATORY  P OWERS   OF   THE  S TATES The states regulate affairs within their borders through their police powers, which derive in part from the authority of the Tenth Amendment. These powers are exercised to protect or promote the public order, health, safety, morals, and general welfare.
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  • Fall '09
  • Gough
  • Business Law, ........., constitutional authority, United  States  Supreme  Court

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